LETTER: The power of change takes just one person

Re: Dogs on buses debate

Let me give an example of how a small action can grow into something of significance. Forty years ago in Ottawa, I started collecting glass and tin cans for recycling in my carport in Manor Park.  I drove the growing collection to Kanata for glass and tin crushing, and recycling. After the first year, I brought Pollution Probe in and they opened depots across Ottawa to accept recyclables, and this then morphed into the Blue Box program.

Margaret Mead wrote: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful and committed citizens can change the world. Indeed it’s the only thing that ever has”. She also wrote: “It is all our responsibility to leave this planet in better shape for future generations than we found it.”

Those of us with dogs are realizing that the constant use of our cars adds to the toxic emissions polluting the air we breathe. We want to leave our cars at home, particularly travelling downtown or to dog-off leash parks. This is just a small step towards preventing global warming.

I reiterate that bus drivers would have the option of refusing a dog on the bus, if there’s a guide dog on board or someone with bad allergies to dogs or a child who is afraid of dogs.

Bicycles are allowed on some buses. So why can’t there be dog-friendly buses, too?

It is up to the BC Regional Transit Commission to make the final decision. I would ask your readers to look at the larger picture of global warming and to accept that small actions lead to larger changes.

Daphne M. Taylor

Saanich