(File)

Top CEOs earned average worker’s annual salary by mid-morning today

Canada’s highest paid 100 CEOs made on average $11.8 million in 2018, report says

A new report says Canada’s 100 highest-paid chief executives were paid record amounts in 2018 in comparison to the employees beneath them.

The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives says the average CEO at a top publicly traded company would have made as much money as the average Canadian worker will make all year as of 10:09 this morning.

The centre says those CEOs made 227 times more than the average worker made in 2018, the most recent year figures are available.

That’s up from 197 times average worker pay in 2017, and is the earliest time on record in the 13 years the centre has been tracking the numbers.

The report also found 79 per cent of the average CEO’s pay in 2018 came from bonuses related to company stock prices, even in some cases where companies were losing money.

As well, just four women are among Canada’s richest 100 CEOs, up from three last year.

“Growth in the vast gap between excessive CEO compensation and average incomes is an indicator of Canada’s income inequality juggernaut,” said report author and CCPA senior economist David Macdonald.

“Wealth continues to concentrate at the very top while average incomes barely keep up with inflation.”

The country’s highest paid 100 CEOs, working for firms on the S&P/TSX Composite index, made, on average, $11.8 million in 2018, according to the report.

In 2016 the average CEO income was $10.4 million.

READ MORE: Female CEOs are competitively paid, but greatly outnumbered

And while average worker pay rose just 2.6 per cent between 2017 and 2018, top CEOs saw their pay rise by 18 per cent during the same period, the CCPA said.

Macdonald suggests the federal government could address excessive CEO pay through a review of tax loopholes, as proposed in the Liberals’ December fiscal update, with a focus on the preferential treatment of stock options and capital gains.

Finance Minister Bill Morneau has been tasked with changing rules for stock-option deductions, as well as reviewing tax expenditures with an eye on the wealthy, as part of his ministerial mandate letter published last month.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Oak Bay pandemic project gets 300 submissions

Gage Gallery exhibit shows how people cope during crisis

Peninsula food bank receives $1,000 donation from local retailer

House of Lily Koi raised the money through the annual food bank fundraiser

Garden-sharing map connects Victoria landowners and gardeners

U-Map created by Young Agrarians after COVID-19 created uptick in garden matching requests

Saanich wins award for climate plan cut from 2020 budget

‘It’s truly an exceptional plan,’ says councillor disappointed with lack of funding

QUIZ: A celebration of dogs

These are the dog days of summer. How much do you know about dogs?

First glimpse of Canada’s true COVID-19 infection rate expected mid-July

At least 105,000 Canadians have tested positive for COVID-19 since the coronavirus was identified

Annual music event in Comox Valley celebrates online instead

Vancouver Island MusicFest holds virtual celebration set for July 10

Police ramp up efforts to get impaired drivers off B.C. roads this summer

July is dedicated to the Summer CounterAttack Impaired Driving Campaign

Migrant workers stage multi-city action for full status amid COVID-19 risks

‘COVID-19 has exacerbated an existing crisis’

Okanagan school drops ‘Rebels’ sports team name, citing links with U.S. Civil War

Name and formerly-used images “fly in the face” of the district’s human rights policy, says board chair

PHOTOS: B.C.’s top doc picks up personalized Fluevog shoes, tours mural exhibition

Murals of Gratitude exhibit includes at least one portrait of Henry alongside paintings of health-care workers

In troubled times: Independence Day in a land of confusion

Buffeted by invisible forces and just plain worn out, the United States of America celebrates its 244th birthday

Stop enforcing sex work laws during COVID-19, advocates say

There are provisions in Canada’s prostitution laws that make workers immune from prosecution, but not from arrest

Most Read