PHOTOS: Langford students flash back to 1995 with time capsule

Grade 5 Lakewood Elementary students Riley Bloey (left), Serenity Vrebosch and Maddi Wall take a look at the student submissions for the 1995 time capsule. (Aaron Guillen/News Staff)Grade 5 Lakewood Elementary students Riley Bloey (left), Serenity Vrebosch and Maddi Wall take a look at the student submissions for the 1995 time capsule. (Aaron Guillen/News Staff)
Pogs was the game of 1995 for most Lakewood Elementary students. The majority of papers in the time capsule have a pog attached to their page. (Aaron Guillen/News Staff)Pogs was the game of 1995 for most Lakewood Elementary students. The majority of papers in the time capsule have a pog attached to their page. (Aaron Guillen/News Staff)
A time capsule submission from a Grade 2 Lakewood Elementary back in 1995. (Aaron Guillen/News Staff)A time capsule submission from a Grade 2 Lakewood Elementary back in 1995. (Aaron Guillen/News Staff)
Lakewood Elementary staff filmed moving-in day on VHS tape. (Aaron Guillen/News Staff)Lakewood Elementary staff filmed moving-in day on VHS tape. (Aaron Guillen/News Staff)
Grade 5 Lakewood Elementary students watch the VHS tape of moving-in day back in January 1995. (Aaron Guillen/News Staff)Grade 5 Lakewood Elementary students watch the VHS tape of moving-in day back in January 1995. (Aaron Guillen/News Staff)
PHOTOS: Langford students flash back to 1995 with time capsule

Do we still have a beautiful earth? Do we still have an ozone layer? Are you married? Those are some of the questions Langford elementary students placed in a time capsule back in 1995.

On Monday, Lakewood Elementary staff dusted off their display case and brought out a 25-year project in the making. A time capsule that captured the first year Lakewood opened in February 1995.

While some things never change, like Stew Young being the mayor of Langford, Windows 95 is a little outdated. Toy Story has made three sequels and ‘Pogs’ are widely unknown to Grade 5 students at Lakewood Elementary.

“I have no idea what this is,” Maddi Wall says, holding up a Pog with a drawing of a tongue and eyes bulging out of a brain.

READ MORE: Colwood middle school students let sparks fly at trades workshop

Pogs shot to popularity in the ‘90s on school playgrounds. Kids would stack decorated flat cardboard discs while the challenger would try to knock the pieces over with a heavier or thicker piece of cardboard. Usually, the pieces that faced up at the end of the round would be for keeps.

“Being able to leave your footprint essentially is really neat,” said principal Bryan Johnson. “To see some alumni and staff return just for the unveiling was amazing. It reminds you of the similarities our students share with those back then … except they have no clue what Pogs are.”

ALSO READ: Colwood school’s mascot embarks on cross-country journey

Similar to students from 25 years ago, Grade 5 student Dominic Ziegart wants to know who he’ll be married to. He also wonders what the newest car looks like and what the latest video game systems will be. Fellow Grade 5 student Serenity Vrebosch wonders if they could somehow put an iPhone, Nintendo Switch, or Fortnite into a time capsule.

Johnson said students will be given the chance to add their own piece of history to a time capsule that will be opened in another 25 years, in 2045. The ceremony will take place in March.

aaron.guillen@goldstreamgazette.com