Find out how students at the Canadian School of Natural Nutrition are “Learning to Change Lives,” at upcoming open houses at the school’s Nanaimo campus, Nov. 16, and Victoria campus, Nov. 23.

25 years of goodness: Training nutritionists to help others enjoy better health

Canadian School of Natural Nutrition hosting info open house Nov. 23 in Victoria

You may already be conscious and diligent about integrating a nutritional diet into your healthy lifestyle, but does the idea of working to help others find the right mix appeal to you?

If so, a Nov. 23 informational open house hosted at the Canadian School of Natural Nutrition (CSNN) in Victoria could be your opportunity to take the next step on that pathway. Learn how to harness your passion and turn it into a professional certification as a Registered Holistic Nutritionist.

“The open houses are a chance for prospective students to experience the school, hear from instructors what and how they teach, and get a sense of what students would be learning,” says Dona Bradley, R.H.N., manager of CSNN Vancouver Island.

Helping sift through the details

When it comes to finding good information on healthy nutrition, the public is faced with conflicting reports from online sources and word-of-mouth suggestions about the latest fad diets, Bradley says. That’s where a knowledgeable nutritionist can help, she says.

“It’s hard for people to sort out what is the truth, what isn’t and what is simply people trying to sell us something. People seem more confused now than less; they seem to really need that common-sense approach to regaining their health in a natural way.”

CSNN’s curriculum is based about 30 per cent on “hard science” and the rest on social sciences, which Bradley says is critical for taking a holistic approach to health. “We also teach about the anatomy and pathology of the body, how it works and what it needs to function well in terms of the macronutrients and micronutrients.”

It’s about more than just food

The school’s motto, “Learning to Change Lives,” is not a hollow promise, says Victoria campus manager of CSNN Vancouver Island, Audrey Sidnick, R.H.N. It’s a commitment to giving students the tools to help future clients sort out what works for them healthwise, and what doesn’t. “It’s definitely about more than food, we need to understand the body,” she says. “It’s not only what you eat, but what your body can do with that.”

Learning to understand the science around food, and how natural nutrients affect the body is a way to help more people veer away from today’s prevalent pharmaceutical route, where “there’s a pill for everything,” she says.

Every person has individual nutritional needs

CSNN, which has been “teaching the medicine of the future” since 1994, does not advocate any one type of dietary habits. Instead they take an integrative approach that sees diet as just one part – a constantly changing one, based on bio-individuality, lifestyle, an individual’s health plan and personal preferences, Sidnick says.

*****

The free open house happens Nov. 23 from 1 to 3:30 p.m. at the CSNN Victoria classroom, 3045 Douglas St. RSVP to eventbrite.ca or for more information email victoria@csnn.ca or call 250-888-4231.

If you’re unable to make this time, an earlier open house happens in Nanaimo on Nov. 16 from 1-4 p.m. at 2C-91 Front St. (RSVP to eventbrite.ca for this event). Email v.i@csnn.ca or call 250-741-4805 for more details.

You can also follow the school on Facebook and Instagram.

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