‘It just feels like a little community,’ Roslyn Wagstaff says of working at the Garth Homer Centre in Saanich.

‘The minute I walked in I thought, I want to work here’

Garth Homer staff and clients reap rewards of a winning approach

Roslyn Wagstaff had never visited the Garth Homer Centre before the day she dropped off a participant of one of the centre’s day programs.

“The minute I walked in I thought, ‘I want to work here,’” recalls the team co-ordinator for the centre’s Pathways team. “It has such a great energy – everyone is smiling and ready to help you.”

The Garth Homer Society provides day and residential programs for adults with developmental disabilities in Greater Victoria. Based at Saanich’s Garth Homer Centre, program participants enjoy a wide range of community- and centre-based activities, selecting daily activities based on their individual interests.

In addition to successful life skills and geriatric initiatives, Garth Homer also offers a residential program, supporting a variety of individuals, including those with complex medical support needs, says Phemie Guttin, Executive Director, Service Operations.

“It just feels like a little community,” Roslyn says. From workouts at the gym to trips to see local theatre productions, “everything you can think of, we do it!”

That wealth of opportunity for the clients also offers numerous employment options for staff, from one-on-one work to group work to more administrative roles, Roslyn says.

Current career opportunities range from residential services to care workers to community support staff.

The Garth Homer Society employs 200 skilled individuals across many fields. Competitive wages, good benefits, ongoing education and room for advancement are part of the package. But it’s what’s behind those “nuts and bolts” of the job that resonates with team members – the opportunity to make a difference in people’s lives.

“Everyone is so helpful and the support of the participants is exemplary – everybody goes above and beyond – and you can see how much they get out of their day,” says Roslyn, whose team of 11 serves 37 full- and part-time participants, typically older adults who started with the centre when they were younger.

To learn more about the Garth Homer Society’s current employment opportunities, and join a community of caregivers who spend every day making a difference in the lives of others, visit garthhomersociety.org.

“I can honestly say this is a great place to work,” Roslyn says. “I have an amazing team and they’re all happy to come to work, and I think that speaks volumes.”

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