Peter McCartney (right), climate campaigner for the Wilderness Committee, delivers more than 16,000 signatures in support of a provincial ban on fracking to Green Party MLA Sonia Furstenau. (Keri Coles/News staff)

16,000 signatures supporting a ban on fracking delivered to B.C. legislature

Wilderness Committee delivers petition to Green Party MLA Sonia Furstenau

A black, 15-foot fracking rig built out of PVC piping adorned the front steps of the B.C. legislature Wednesday as a backdrop to a petition drop calling for a province-wide ban on fracking.

The Wilderness Committee delivered more than 16,000 signatures in brown boxes to Green Party MLA Sonia Furstenau at the provincial legislature “with hopes to preempt the 9,000 new frack wells needed for two liquified natural gas (LNG) projects on the coast.”

RELATED: LNG can help B.C. prepare for future energy sources, prof says

A $40-billion LNG project, announced in October, will carry natural gas through a pipeline from the Peace region to Kitimat before being shipped overseas. It marks the largest private-sector investment in Canadian history.

“Communities here in B.C. and across the world are already reeling from the impacts of climate change,” said climate campaigner Peter McCartney, who passed the signatures over to Furstenau. “But fracking continues to poison vast amounts of precious water and accelerate the climate crisis even as renewable energy gets cheaper every day.”

Furstenau said she will present the petition after question period in the legislature Wednesday afternoon.

“It’s time for us to reorient towards a cleaner, greener energy in B.C.,” said Furstenau. “In the face of the mounting consequences of climate change, the last thing we need to do is add more incentive and provide more public funding to an industry that is contributing to climate change, which we then pay for at another level of government to address those impacts.”

RELATED: B.C. NDP offers tax breaks to jumpstart LNG Canada in Kitimat

After the LNG announcement in October, Kevin Hanna, director at the Centre for Environmental Assessment Research at the University of British Columbia, told Black Press Media that if natural gas replaces coal and keeps new factories from opening in China, there is a net benefit.

“If we see it as a transitional fuel, it could put B.C. in a really good position to provide that product to market as they bring other products online,” Hanna said.

The Wilderness Committee and 16,000 British Columbians brought their voices forward to the legislature Wednesday to express concern about the potential impacts of the industry locally – to the water supply and environment.

“We’re putting these LNG producers on notice,” said McCartney. “Mark my words — it is only a matter of time until we see a ban on fracking in British Columbia, and time is short.”


 

keri.coles@blackpress.ca

Follow us on Instagram
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Saanich property tax notices in the mail, residents unable to pay in person

Payment options, late penalties adjusted due to COVID-19

Name of victims ‘ripped down’ from Victoria display

Organizers feel the act is ‘malicious’

Government Street becomes pedestrian-priority corridor

One block of downtown street closed to cars entirely

‘The face of Belmont’: Custodial staff at Langford school pivot to support parents, students

Staff serve as point of contact for parents, students with school

Saanich teen launches free online tutoring website

School Helpers matches volunteer tutors with students

March dental conference key to many of B.C.’s COVID-19 cases

Early infections from China, Iran were quickly contained

POLL: Are you sending your children back to school this month?

Classrooms looked decidedly different when students headed back to school for the… Continue reading

Cortes Island affordable housing project hangs by a thread

Regional decision makers resort to COVID-19 concerns despite virtual meeting option and push hearing to September

MAP: Dr. Henry reveals which B.C. regions have seen most COVID-19 cases

B.C. health officials release a first look at how the novel coronavirus has reached all corners of the province

North Island recreation camping site closed due to vandalism

Damage happens every year, forcing site manager to reallocate improvement budget to repairs

Tla-o-qui-aht First Nation woman, 26, fatally shot by police in Edmundston, N.B.

Police were conducting a well-being check at the time of the incident

Seniors to receive up to $500 in promised COVID-19 emergency aid in early July

The Liberal government first promised the extra help in mid-May, but had to create a new system to deliver the aid

VIDEO: Revelstoke bear wanders into Animal House pet store

Staff got ready to chase it out with a broom

Man found dead in his tent at Island homeless camp

Facebook posts tell of personal struggles and attempts to stay clean and sober

Most Read