This photo of a young girl gathering eggs on the West Shore was among the entries received for Black Press' Actions for Good Food Contest

Annual Good Food Summit in Victoria will workshop food sustainability ideas

Variety of topics covered, innovation fair part of event

Black Press community newspaper readers may recall seeing a number of stories this fall regarding CR FAIR, the Capital Region Food and Agriculture Initiatives Roundtable.

With its accompanying contest, Actions for Good Food, that asked readers to submit a photo illustrating their idea of what good food means to them, the program has prompted many people to further investigate CR FAIR and its goals and activities.

On Thursday (Nov. 17), the local non-profit is hosting the Good Food Summit, its annual food and agriculture networking and food system checkup, from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Ambrosia Centre, 638 Fisgard St. in Victoria.

“There’s been lots of people interested in hooking in and seeing what’s going on,” said Linda Geggie, executive director of CR FAIR. “From the registrations, I can see lots of new names and faces that I haven’t seen before.”

Geggie has been involved since the beginning of CR FAIR in 1997 and says its overarching mandate is three-fold: to increase local food production 25 per cent by 2025; to decrease food insecurity by 25 cent by 2025, amongst the more vulnerable members of our society, and to double their efforts around food literacy.

The Good Food Summit includes a variety of workshop-style talks touching on such topics as engaging the next generation of good food leaders, finding ways to attract more nutritionally diverse food donations, moving forward public policy around healthy food and supporting farmers, and strengthening good food leadership.

As part of the morning session, attendees can visit an innovation fair with a variety of food and farm-related organizations represented. And of course, the $500 prize for the winner of the Actions for Good Food contest will be drawn.

“The primary thing that happens every year is that the Good Food Summit is a great opportunity for people who share similar concerns, or ideas that are related to initiatives, to just be able to connect,” Geggie said. “People get to hear about some really innovative work that is going on. It’s really inspiring and people leave recharged after making these connections.”

Interest in the event has been brisk, as just 30 spots remained as of Sunday afternoon. Advance registration can be done online until Nov. 15 by visiting crfair.ca. The $15 ticket price includes lunch/snacks provided by Colwood-based Skookum Cafe. Tickets will be sold at the door as space permits. Registration is at 8:30 a.m.

editor@goldstreamgazette.com

 

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