B.C. provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry speaks on pandemic response at the B.C. legislature, May 6, 2020. (B.C. government)

B.C. provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry speaks on pandemic response at the B.C. legislature, May 6, 2020. (B.C. government)

B.C. begins broad COVID-19 survey, with option for antibody testing

Database of health, work impacts to guide public health

The B.C. Centre for Disease control has launched an online survey to measure the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on people’s work, health and habits, and the level of “community immunity” to the novel coronavirus.

The survey launch comes as Health Canada has approved an antibody test to measure the immunity of people who have recovered from COVID-19, some of whom may not know they were exposed.

“This is a collaboration with all of our medical health officers, our public health officers around the province, the provincial health services authority, as well as my office,” provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said in her daily update May 12. “And the information we gather will help inform the decisions we make in the weeks and months ahead.”

The survey is anonymous, using the University of B.C. secure research tool used in medical studies. It offers participants options to sign up for antibody testing using LIAISON, a test method now approved by Health Canada and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Any B.C. resident aged 18 or older can take the COVID-19 survey, with the option of doing so anonymously or providing a B.C. medical ID number confidentially for follow-up and possible antibody testing. It takes about 15 minutes to complete, and is open until May 31.

“The B.C. Population Health Survey has been developed as a result of the continuing global spread of COVID-19, which will require ongoing public health surveillance and response activities in the coming months of 2020,” the BCCDC says on its website. “The unintended impacts on the social, economic, physical health, mental wellness and resiliency of communities are not well understood.”

The survey ends with an option to join the COVID-19 Community Immunity Assessment by providing a blood sample to labs testing for the virus, which are adding antibody testing now that a test has been approved by Health Canada.

Participants can also sign up for the COVID-19 Early Warning Network, allowing them to notify public health officials of symptoms they experience, to more quickly identify regions of B.C. where public health measures can be taken to control future waves of infection.

RELATED: Health Canada approves test for COVID-19 antibodies

RELATED: B.C. records just 7 new cases as reopening inches closer

RELATED: ‘Community immunity’ testing uses B.C. patients

Questions include age, gender, B.C. community of residence, and whether you have been “sick with a new or worsening cough and/or a fever” since January 2020. The survey also asks if participants received the seasonal influenza vaccine that was available this past fall and winter, and if they have been in close contact with anyone who has been diagnosed positive for COVID-19.

It asks if participants have been tested one or more times for the novel coronavirus, or have travelled outside B.C. since Jan. 1. Participants are asked if they are health care or other essential workers, including grocery store employees, transit drivers, law enforcement, first responders or social workers who serve the public or patients directly.

It surveys use of common preventive actions such as frequent hand washing, making only essential trips outside of the home, working from home or wearing a mask. It also asks where you get your information on COVID-19, including newspapers, radio and TV, the BCCDC and other provincial health websites, family doctor or the 8-1-1 health information line, social media and friends and family.

There are questions about exercise, sleep, food and alcohol consumption, chronic health conditions, disabilities, smoking and perceived changes in anxiety, depression or irritability since the pandemic began.

The survey also asks if participants have had difficulty getting health care, or have avoided seeking health care, and if they are interested in remote health care using video or phone calls.


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Coronavirus

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Greater Victoria’s Coldest Night walks go virtual this year on Feb. 20. (Photo courtesy Our Place Society)
Our Place neighbourhood walks raise money for Greater Victoria homeless

2021 Coldest Night of the Year fundraiser goes virtual

Members of the Saanich Fire Department can be seen working to put out a fire in the 4500-block of Chattertown Way on Jan. 26. (Saanich Fire/Twitter)
UPDATED: One cat killed, another resuscitated following blaze in Saanich townhouse

Neighbours evacuated following fire on Chatterton Way, third cat still missing

Air Canada /Jazz flight 8081 from Vancouver to Victoria on Jan. 22 had a confirmed cases of COVID-19 onboard, according to the BC Centre for Disease Control. (Black Press Media file photo)
(Black Press Media file photo)
Victoria, Saanich and Oak Bay fire reach ‘modern’ service agreement

Negotiations to update 1980 firefighting agreement began in 2015, stalled in 2020

An independent review is underway at the Royal BC Museum after employees called out systemic, individual racism at the institution. (Twitter/RBCM)
Royal BC Museum faces allegations of systemic racism, toxic work environment

Formal investigation, survey and training launched at museum

Rolling seven-day average of cases by B.C. health authority to Jan. 21. Fraser Health in purple, Vancouver Coastal red, Interior Health orange, Northern Health green and Vancouver Island blue. (B.C. Centre for Disease Control)
2nd COVID vaccine doses on hold as B.C. delivery delayed again

New COVID-19 cases slowing in Fraser Health region

A woman wearing a protective face mask to curb the spread of COVID-19 walks past a mural in Victoria, B.C., on Monday, Dec. 7, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Marissa Tiel
Five big lessons experts say Canada should learn from COVID-19:

‘What should be done to reduce the harms the next time a virus arises?’ Disease control experts answer

A Vancouver Police Department patch is seen on an officer’s uniform as she makes a phone call. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Vancouver man calls 911 to report his own stabbing, leading to arrest: police

Officers located the suspect a few blocks away. He was holding a bloody knife.

Christopher Anthony Craig Dick is wanted by the Port Alberni RCMP in connection to multiple investigations. (SUBMITTED PHOTO)
Vancouver Island RCMP seek man connected to assault investigations

Christopher Dick, 36, was recently in the North Cowichan and Duncan region

Vernon has agreed to a goose cull to control the over-populated invasive species making a muck of area parks and beaches. (Morning Star file photo)
Okanagan city pulls the trigger on goose cull

City asking neighbours to also help control over-population of geese

Tahsis mayor Martin Davis stands with an old-growth tree in McKelvie Creek Valley. The village of Tahsis signed a Letter of Understanding with forestry company Western Forest Products to establish McKelvie watershed as a protected area. Photo courtesy, TJ Watt.
Landmark deal expected to protect Tahsis watershed from logging

Tahsis and WFP agree on letter of understanding to preserve McKelvie Creek Valley within TFL 19

FILE – Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau delivers his opening remarks at a news conference outside Rideau cottage in Ottawa, Tuesday, January 19, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Vaccine CEO ‘very, very clear’ that Canada’s contracts will be honoured: Trudeau

Trudeau says he spoke to Moderna CEO on the morning of Jan. 26

Most Read