B.C. massage therapist reprimanded, fined for exposing patients’ breasts

Registered massage therapist admits professional misconduct

A registered massage therapist in Enderby is facing fines and consequences after undraping and exposing the breasts of two patients without written consent.

Dennis Desrochers had two complaints filed to the College of Massage Therapists of British Columbia in 2006 and 2012 accusing him of uncovering the women without written permission.

Following investigations, Desrochers will be permanently banned from providing breast examination services to female patients and will be fined $1,000 and $500 to cover portions of the investigation costs. The RMT must also undergo further education and one-on-one training.

The first complainant said she was not advised by the RMT there were any alternative draping options after he uncovered her from the waist up while she was laying face-up on the massage table, her chest exposed.

Desrochers told the college he asked the young woman, who was being treated for significant injuries if she was OK with being undraped and “recalls her seeming ambivalent and saying, ‘Yeah, OK, let’s try it,’” the report reads.

The second complaint came in 2012, but Desrochers told the college he could “no longer specifically recollect the complainant or the massage therapy session in question.”

Both complainants said they did not provide consent in writing before the massage and the RMT did not provide them with alternative draping options.

In Desrochers’ contractual deal with the college, made on Sept. 19, 2019, he acknowledged he committed professional misconduct according to the college’s bylaws that state, “during treatment, a Registrant shall arrange the draping so that only the part of a patient’s body that is being treated is exposed and all other parts are appropriately draped.”

In a letter to the editor submitted on Oct. 4, an Enderby RMT said, “uncovering breasts is not necessary.”

“A good RMT can work through sheets to address soft tissues in the area,” North Okanagan Therapeutics’ Gayle Heinrich said.

READ MORE: RMT says consent a must in massage therapy

READ MORE: Grow-op has water cut by Vernon bylaw


@caitleerach
Caitlin.clow@vernonmorningstar.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

UVic students return from Hong Kong amidst growing tension

All eight University of Victoria exchange students have returned to Canada

ICBC, province urge residents to plan ahead for winter weather

Greater Victoria should gear up and have a plan in place

65-million-year-old triceratops makes its debut in Victoria

Dino Lab Inc. is excavating the fossilized remains of a 65-million-year-old dinosaur

Tillicum Centre evacuated after false alarm in Save-On-Foods

A fire alarm was mistakenly activated by falling food

VIDEO: ‘Climate emergency’ is Oxford’s 2019 Word of the Year

Other words on the shortlist included ‘extinction,’ ‘climate denial’ and ‘eco-anxiety’

POLL: Do you plan on making any purchases on Black Friday?

We’ve all seen the images. Shoppers rioting outside of a store in… Continue reading

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers wanted list for the week of Nov. 19

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

Canucks erupt with 5 power-play goals in win over Nashville

Vancouver ends three-game slide with 6-3 triumph over Predators

Nanaimo man caught with more than 200,000 child porn images to be sentenced

Crown says Aaron Macrae recorded video of children on buses and at his workplace

Vancouver Island hunters may have harvested deer in area known for chronic wasting disease

Conservation officers make urgent request to public for any information

B.C. widow suing health authority after ‘untreatable’ superbug killed her husband

New Public Agency Health report puts Canadian death toll at 5,400 in 2018

Changes to B.C. building code address secondary suites, energy efficiency

Housing Minister Selina Robinson says the changes will help create more affordable housing

Most Read