Trustee Richard Franklin suggested at this week’s board meeting that it would be better for a new board to pass their own strategic plan, rather than continue with whatever the previous board thought the priorities should be. Photo by Mike Davies/Campbell River Mirror

Campbell River School District to realign strategic plan with election cycle

Now that elections are every four years, a five-year strategic plan doesn’t really work

The next Campbell River School District (SD72) strategic plan will likely be “owned” by the board who passes it.

With the current strategic plan coming to an end next year, they need to start working on the next one, Superintendent Tom Longridge reminded the Board of Education at this week’s public meeting – the first of the new school year. But with the recent change in board election terms, Longridge asked, would it be prudent to review the terms of the strategic plan, as well?

“As we’re engaging in the planning for the next board’s strategic plan, we came up against some questions that we need answered by the board, just to make sure we’re checking our assumptions,” Longridge said.

The previous plan was five years in duration and is due to expire in December of 2018, which means they will need to have a new one in place to begin 2019. But with an election coming up next fall, Longridge was wondering if the board would like to change that timeline.

When the strategic plan was created, Longridge said, trustees were elected to three-year terms. Now that they are elected to four-year terms, it was thought maybe they should look at re-aligning the strategic plan to better line up with the terms of the board members who will pass it.

“When I was elected to the board, one of the things that occurred was being presented with the board’s strategic plan,” said Trustee Richard Franklin. “It wasn’t my plan, it was the former board’s plan. I was thinking it would be great if the board who was actually going to implement the plan could be the one to develop the plan. That could be facilitated by this board doing all sorts of groundwork and discussion and surveying the school system, talking to senior managers and everyone in the education family here in Campbell River – finding out the direction we should go – but because it’s the next board who is going to be owning that plan, they need to be the ones to pass it.”

Trustee Joyce McMann agreed, adding that when she was first elected to the board, creating a strategic plan was one of the first orders of business, “and I found that extremely helpful in terms of accumulating the understanding of what the organization was, what the opportunities for input were, and having the opportunity to discuss it with other board members really helped us coalesce as a board.”

Trustee John Kerr also threw his support behind the idea that the timeline and duration of the strategic plan should change with the election cycle.

“We may well find that there are people elected to the new board who will have a different direction they want to take the board in,” Kerr said. “For them to have to basically be saddled with a plan in which they had no input and with which they may not agree, is not what we want to be doing.”

One of the problems with having the new board create the strategic plan is that it may create a situation where there isn’t one in place while that happens. With the current plan expiring in December and the board not being elected until November, it doesn’t leave much time to get the plan put into place.

“That’s a tight turnaround,” admitted Secretary-Treasurer Kevin Patrick, “and there likely could be a gap, depending on how long the board feels they need, but if all the data has been gathered (by this board), it could be in place by February of 2019.

“This is actually a great opportunity and time to think about trying to align everything.”

It was also pointed out by Trustee Kerr that any gap would just be filled by the previous plan while the new one was in development, anyway.

It was decided that the recommendation to staff should be to begin working on the background for the next strategic plan to be four years in duration, implemented by the next board as soon as possible after being elected.

SD72

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A bear similar to this black bear is believed responsible for killing a llama in Saanich on Oct. 19. (Black Press Media file photo)
Saanich residents warned to watch livestock after bear kills llama

Officers with Conservation, Saanich police could not track the bear they feel may not fear humans

More than 250 riders took part in the fifth annual Tripleshot CrossFondo, which riders across parts of the Saanich Peninsula, including this field near Sluggett Farms. (Wolf Depner/News Staff)
Tripleshot CrossFondo rides across Saanich Peninsula

More than 250 cyclists took part in mystery-course race

With local MLA Adam Olsen looking on, BC Greens leader Sonia Furstenau said a Green government would convert BC Ferries into a Crown corporation Wolf Depner/News Staff)
Green leader Sonia Furstenau promises to convert BC Ferries back into Crown corporation

Promise comes Monday afternoon with five days left in campaign

A 23-foot sailboat that broke free from its anchor was smashed against Cattle Point during the early October south-easterly storms. (Ron Geezin Photo)
Storm-smashed boat pulled off rocks of Cattle Point in Oak Bay

Sailboat a casualty of last week’s big storms

Saanich police are warning residents to be aware of a non-aggressive bear sighting in the 400-block of Haliburton Terrace. (Black Press Media file photo)
Non-aggressive bear spotted in Saanich neighbourhood

Saanich police advise residents to be aware of sighting in the 400-block of Haliburton Terrace

Advance polls are open from Oct. 15 to 21 with election day on Oct. 24. (Black Press Media file photo)
A passer-by walks past a COVID-19 testing clinic in Montreal, Friday, Oct. 16, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
Canada ‘yet to see’ deaths due to recent COVID surge as cases hit 200,000

Much of the increase in case numbers can be attributed to Ontario and Quebec

Police confirm human remains were found in a recycling bin in Vancouver on Oct. 18, 2020. (Black Press Media file photo)
Human remains found in recycling bin floating near Vancouver beach

Police asking nearby residents to see if their recycling bin has gone missing

(File photo)
RCMP: Two men face charges in reported Parksville fatal hit-and-run

Investigation into man’s death began in August of 2019

B.C. Liberal leader Andrew Wilkinson visits a North Vancouver daycare to announce his party’s election promises for child care, Oct. 9, 2020. (B.C. Liberal Party video)
B.C. parties pitch costly child care programs in pandemic

B.C. Liberals say they’ll deliver on NDP’s $10-a-day promise for lower-income families

Steven Michael Bacon pleaded not guilty to a charge of first-degree murder of Nanaimo teen Makayla Chang. (Photos submitted)
Accused pleads not guilty in Nanaimo teen’s 2017 murder

Steven Bacon appeared in Nanaimo court Monday via video link from Thunder Bay

Voting station at Tzeachten Hall in the riding of Chilliwack-Kent on the first day of advance voting in the provincial election on Oct. 15, 2020. (Paul Henderson/ Chilliwack Progress)
B.C. VOTES 2020: 380,000 British Columbians head to polls in first 4 days of advance voting

Some of highest voter turnout so far has been seen on Vancouver Island and in Shuswap

Grant and Barbara Howse, in quarantine in Invermere. Mike Turner photo
Denied entry into U.S., Kootenay couple still forced to quarantine for 2 weeks

The rules around crossing the U.S. border led to a bizarre situation for an Invermere couple

Most Read