Campfire ban lifted for Coastal Fire Centre

There have been 135 human-caused wildfires in the region since April 1

Effective at noon on Sept. 11, campfires will once again be allowed throughout British Columbia’s Coastal Fire Centre.

The use of tiki torches, chimineas, outdoor stoves and portable campfire’s that are not CSA-approved or ULC-approved will also be permitted in the region. However, local governments may still have their own burning restrictions in place, so people should always check with local authorities before lighting any fire of any size.

The current prohibition on larger Category 2 and Category 3 open fires remains in effect throughout the Coastal Fire Centre, with the exception of the “fog zone”.

This includes prohibitions on:

  • stubble or grass burning of any size
  • the use of sky lanterns
  • the use of fireworks (including firecrackers)
  • the use of burn barrels or burning cages of any size or description
  • the use of binary exploding targets (e.g. for target practice)

A map showing the affected areas is available online.

The fog zone is a two-kilometre strip of land along the outer coast of Vancouver Island, stretches from Owen Point (near Port Renfrew) north to the tip of Vancouver Island, and around to the boundary of the District of Port Hardy. It also extends inland two kilometres from the high tide point.

A map of the fog zone is available here.

2018 Wildfire season

Since April 1, there have been 135 human-caused wildfires within the Coastal Fire Centre, which is higher than the 10-year average. Human-caused wildfires are completely preventable and unnecessarily divert firefighting resources from naturally caused wildfires, according to the province.

Some important campfire safety tips include:

  • Have a hand tool or at least eight litres of water available to properly extinguish a campfire.
  • Campfires cannot be larger than 0.5 metres high by 0.5 metres wide.
  • Do not light a campfire or keep it burning in windy conditions. Weather can change quickly and the wind may carry embers to other combustible material.
  • Maintain a fireguard around the campfire. This is a fuel-free area where all flammable materials (grass, kindling, etc.) have been removed.
  • Never leave a campfire unattended.
  • Ensure that the campfire is completely extinguished and the ashes are cool to the touch before leaving the area for any length of time.

BC Wildfire Service produced a video showing how to safely light and maintain a campfire:

The Coastal Fire Centre covers all of the area west of the height of land on the Coast Mountain Range from the U.S.-Canada border at Manning Park, including Tweedsmuir South Provincial Park in the North, the Sunshine Coast, the Lower Mainland, Vancouver Island, the Gulf Islands and Haida Gwaii.

To report a wildfire, unattended campfire or open burning violation, call 1-800-663-5555 or *5555 on your cell phone.

For up-to-date information on current wildfire activity, burning restrictions, road closures and air quality advisories, call 1 888 3-FOREST or visit: www.bcwildfire.ca

You can also follow the latest wildfire news on:

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