Nichola Wade

Nichola Wade

COUNCIL CANDIDATE: Nichola Wade

Saanich News talks to council candidate Nichola Wade

  • Oct. 28, 2011 7:00 p.m.

Birthday: Feb. 16, 1965

Personal background. I live in rural Saanich with my husband and pets. I am a breast cancer survivor. I’m a running coach and a committed half-marathoner.

Professional background. I am a 20-year career civil servant, currently a negotiator with the Ministry of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation. I have an MBA from the Richard Ivey School of Business at the University of Western Ontario.

Political/community experience: I am a former Saanich councillor (from 2001 to 2005) and a former Central Saanich councillor (1996-1999). I’m currently a trustee on the Greater Victoria Public Library Board. I’ve served on numerous boards and committees, including Silver Threads, Meals on Wheels, CRD Arts and Swan Lake Christmas Hill Nature Sanctuary.

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What will be the most pressing issue for Saanich council to deal with in the 2011-2014 term?

Transportation choices – how to bring the best, most affordable mix of transportation choices to the people of Saanich while maintaining community liveability and taxpayer affordability.

 

What has been the biggest failure of the current council?

While there has been significant progress made on housing affordability, we are still falling short of the mark. Senior levels of government, particularly the federal government, must be engaged. Affordability must encompass the full spectrum of housing choices from shared accommodations, to rentals, to home ownership.

 

How do you attract unengaged voters to participate and be interested in municipal politics?

For the youth – better engagement between school systems and local government, to assist young folk to understand the scope of issues managed and influenced by local government. Utilizing social media, we have new opportunities to engage more voters in issues of relevance to them in a manner that speaks to their lifestyles. For others, we will still need to engage them through more traditional methods. The key is to make the connection between the places we live and the importance of good governance to maintain it.