About one in seven Canadian students expressed satisfaction with the transition toward online learning during COVID-19 pandemic. (Pixabay photo)

About one in seven Canadian students expressed satisfaction with the transition toward online learning during COVID-19 pandemic. (Pixabay photo)

COVID-19 skill loss will hurt global economic output for rest of century: survey

About one in seven Canadian students satisfied with transition toward online learning

A representative survey gives Canada a less than stellar grade when it comes to making the digital transition during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Citrix-commissioned survey asked 3,500 parents with children aged six to 18 years and 3,500 university students across seven developed countries including Canada in July and August about the move toward online learning.

None of the surveyed countries reported a high degree of satisfaction. Singapore, which possesses perhaps the most advanced digital infrastructure in the world, recorded the highest level of satisfaction with 30 per cent of students saying they were satisfied with the transition toward online learning, followed by Australia (25 per cent) with Mexico and the United Kingdom tied with 19 per cent. Canada led the bottom countries with 16 per cent, ahead of Italy with 14 per cent, and Germany with 10 per cent.

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The figures appeared ahead of a report from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Its 2020 survey of education systems around the world found among other points that the COVID-19 pandemic will cause a skill loss that could result in a 1.5 per cent drop in global economic output for the rest of this century. In other words, COVID-19 has not only hit adults in their pocketbooks but will also continue to deny current students future wages by having interrupted their education.

“Learning loss will lead to skill loss, and the skills people have relate to their productivity,” it reads.

The report gives Canada, one of 31 OECD members, an above-average grade in several areas, including the use of digital technology for projects and class work, with Canada (as measured by Alberta’s performance) above the OCED average, when it comes to secondary teachers who “frequently” or “always” let students use digital technology.

Denmark, New Zealand and Australia led the way.


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wolfgang.depner@peninsulanewsreview.com

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