Early sales slow for annual passes at Cedar Hill golf course

Number of annual passes purchased to play at the Cedar Hill Golf Course is down by 15 per cent this year compared to last

The number of annual passes purchased to play at the Cedar Hill Golf Course is down by 15 per cent this year compared to last – but Saanich’s director of parks and recreation said it’s still early in the season to be concerned.

So far, 232 people have bought passes since they went on sale March 20, compared to the 273 purchased by this time last year.

“A lot of the time it’s weather dependent,” said parks and rec director Doug Henderson. “We’ve had past sales well into the first parts of May, so it’s not like (sales are) finished.”

In 2011, a total of 338 passes were sold (162 full passes and 176 restricted passes) – a new low for the golf course. Pass-holder numbers have been in a steady decline for years, with more than 700 passes being sold annually a decade ago.

What has gone up over the years, however, is the cost of buying a pass. Since 2008, the cost of a full pass has gone up $418 to $1,418, while the cost of a restricted pass has risen $262 to $1,087. Limits have been placed on the number of rounds the pass-holders can play each year.

Val Mieras, president of the Cedar Hill Golf Club, said because of the changes at the golf course this year the club has changed one of its longest-standing rules.

“We have it in our club constitution that active members must buy a pass – we’ve changed that, we had to,” Mieras said. “Because the passes went up by so much and down by so many rounds, we have to let members make their own decision whether they’re better off buying green fees instead.”

This year, a full pass costs $68 more than last year. Golfers can play a maximum of 90 rounds, compared to 120 rounds in 2011.

Earlier this year Saanich council voted on a new fee structure that will see the cost of a pass increase again in 2013 and 2014, while the numbers of rounds are reduced each year.

“People have their reasons as to why they would buy and why they wouldn’t buy (a pass),” Henderson said. “All we can do is make sure they know we’re out there, and make sure they understand the value they get (at Cedar Hill).”

– with files from Roszan Holmen

kslavin@saanichnews.com

Just Posted

Light wind sends half of Swiftsure yacht fleet back to shore early

Many racers return overnight in unusual race conditions

Leaving dog in hot car can result in $75,000 fine, prohibition from owning animals, prison

B.C. SPCA received 800 calls last year about dogs left in hot cars

Radio Host Erin Davis pens Mourning Has Broken following death of her daughter

Book by North Saanich woman gives advice to others struggling with grief

Bed Races on Beacon champs ready to defend their title

Race takes place July 7 on Beacon Avenue, raising funds for the Peninsula Youth Clinic

Saanich preschool celebrates 30 years with reunion event

Thousands invited RSVP for Carrot Seed Preschool 30-year celebration

WATCH: Thousands enjoy sunshine at second annual Village Block Party

Cook Street filled with local food, music and more

Social media giants in hot seat as politicians consider regulations in Ottawa

Committee members will also grill representatives from Facebook, Twitter

Wildfire crews watching for dangerous wind shift in High Level, Alta.

The Chuckegg Creek fire is raging out of control about three kilometres southwest of the town

UN urges Canada to take more vulnerable Mexican migrants from Central America

The request comes as the United States takes a harder line on its Mexican border

Mistrial declared in Jamie Bacon murder plot trial

Bacon was on trial for counselling to commit the murder of Person X

B.C. VIEWS: Money-laundering melodrama made for TV

Public inquiry staged to point fingers before 2021 election

Canadian homebuyers escaping high housing costs by moving to secondary cities

In British Columbia, exurbs have grown in the Hope Valley and Kamloops

Feds lay out proposed new rules for voice, video recorders in locomotives

Transport Canada wants to limit use of recorders to if a crew’s actions led to a crash

Most Read