Chief Commissioner Marion Buller speaks to a witness following her testimony during the National Inquiry of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in Richmond, B.C., Friday. (The Canadian Press)

Missing and murdered inquiry emboldens those to move forward: chairwoman

Marion Buller says the inquiry’s value in that respect is too great to be calculated

The head of the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women says some of those who have told their harrowing stories have since redoubled that courage by taking their complaints to police, getting treatment, or reuniting with family.

Marion Buller says the inquiry’s value in that respect is too great to be calculated.

Organizers say nearly 100 people had registered to testify at the final set of public hearings being held in Metro Vancouver this week.

Buller says although the process of sharing their stories is traumatic for survivors and families, it’s an opportunity for them to rewrite history.

She says Canadians are led to believe that as a nation we are kind and generous, but the truth about our history and treatment of Indigenous people suggests otherwise.

The number of Canadians that have contacted the inquiry with interest in learning about violence and fear that have plagued Indigenous women and girls is heartening, Buller says, adding that by understanding the past, Canada will be able to move forward.

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