Langford’s Kimberly Proctor was the victim of a brutal assault and murder in 2010. (Facebook/Kimberly’s Law)

On ninth anniversary of Langford teen’s murder, Kimberly’s Law reintroduced in legislature

Kimberly Proctor was murdered by two of her peers in 2010

On the ninth anniversary of the murder of Langford’s Kimberly Proctor by two of her peers, BC Liberal Mental Health and Addictions Critic Jane Thornthwaite reintroduces the Safe Care Act, also known as Kimberly’s Law, to the Legislature.

“This important piece of legislation will help protect at-risk youth from imminent harm,” says Thornthwaite who first introduced the bill in 2018.

On March 18, 2010, Cameron Moffat, 17, and Kruse Wellwood, 16, lured Proctor to Wellwood’s family home where they raped, tortured and murdered the 18-year-old girl. They put her mutilated body in a duffle bag and dumped it near the Galloping Goose Trail.

The two were tried as adults and are serving life in prison with no possibility of parole for 10 years.

While Proctor’s family still grieves, they have worked hard over the last nine years to help prevent similar tragedies from happening, meeting several times with members of the provincial and federal governments since 2010, as detailed in Kimberly’s Law Facebook page.

RELATED: Proctor family continues to fight for change nine years after horrific Langford murder

If passed, the Safe Care Act will be used as a court-mandated action to protect children in worst-case scenarios involving self-harm, addictions, violent behaviour and sexual exploitation. It would permit courts to authorize the involuntary confinement of children and youth in a secure setting for a short period of time in order to stabilize their emotional and physical health while allowing time to assess their needs and develop a community plan.

“There is a possibility that Kimberly would be alive today if the Safe Care Act was in place. Cameron Moffat and Kruse Wellwood both spiralled out of control while their community, school, their peers watched. Nothing was done,” said Kimberly’s aunt Jo-Ann Landolt.

Landolt doesn’t believe that Moffat and Wellwood would have gone for necessary treatment or counselling voluntarily, something the Safe Care Act would address.

“We really hope that the government will pass this bill so other families won’t have to endure the pain we went through,” said Landolt, who, along with Kimberly’s grandmother Linda Proctor, have been tireless advocates for the legislation.


 

keri.coles@blackpress.ca

Follow us on Instagram
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

‘Each step is a prayer’: Ojibwe man will walk from Hope to Saanich for Indigenous healing, reconciliation

James Taylor departs Sept. 20, returns to Saanich in five days for sacred fire

Donated sculpture in Sidney’s Beacon Park a testament to perseverance

Victoria artist Armando Barbon picked up sculpting 22 years ago

Greater Victoria businesses come together to help Island kids

Langford Lowe’s raises funds for youth mental health all month

Sidney builds community resilience through neighbourhood gatherings

Meet Your Street needs residents to create gatherings, safe interactions

3 new deaths due to COVID-19 in B.C., 139 new cases

B.C. confirms 40 ‘historic cases,’ as well

POLL: Do you plan on allowing your children to go trick or treating this year?

This popular annual social time will look quite different this year due to COVID-19

Ferry riders say lower fares are what’s most needed to improve service

Provincial government announces findings of public engagement process

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dies at 87

The court’s second female justice, died Friday at her home in Washington

Comox Valley protesters send message over old-growth logging

Event in downtown Courtenay was part of wider event on Friday

Application deadline for fish harvester benefits program extended

Those financially impacted by the pandemic have until Oct. 5 to apply

VIDEO: B.C. to launch mouth-rinse COVID-19 test for kids

Test involves swishing and gargling saline in mouth and no deep-nasal swab

Young Canadians have curtailed vaping during pandemic, survey finds

The survey funded by Heart & Stroke also found the decrease in vaping frequency is most notable in British Columbia and Ontario

B.C. teachers file Labour Relations Board application over COVID-19 classroom concerns

The application comes as B.C.’s second week of the new school year comes to a close

Most Read