Seven-year-old Ryder Heron and his four-year-old brother Logan Heron flank their mother Chantal Gore-Langton, who wants the provincial government to settle with striking support workers in School District, where Ryder attends Sidney Elementary School. (Wolf Depner/News Staff)

Sidney mother says ongoing school strike threatens budget

Chantal Gore-Langton calls on both sides to resolve dispute

For Chantal Gore-Langton, the ongoing school strike is more than just a frustrating, stressful inconvenience. It is also a strain on her budget.

The single mother from Sidney said she spent $72 over two days to put the older of her two sons, seven-year-old Ryder, into day camps offered by Panorama Recreation Centre. When added up over a whole week, Gore-Langton could be looking at bill of $180 or more if the strike continues, no small figure by any stretch, especially for a singe mother.

“Being a single mom, it is incredibly difficult,” she said. “I don’t have a lot of extra money to be throwing around. Yes, he has a pass, but it doesn’t make it any easier trying to get him up there and back and trying to get him into the courses.”

RELATED: Bargaining resumes in Saanich School District strike, classes still cancelled

Gore-Langton, like so many other parents affected by the strike of support workers represented by CUPE Local 441 in SD63, has been relying on a network of support, including family members, to provide care for her children with school out.

“He [her son] should be in school,” she said. “There should be no reason why the government can’t make amends, give the support staff what they are requesting, which is legitimately fair across the board, and get the kids back into school,” she said.

Along the way, she has shared her frustrations with other parents and officials including local MLA Adam Olsen.

“I feel, as a tax paying citizen, that my tax dollars should be going towards the teachers and support staff pay rather than putting kids in day camps or child care,” she said in a letter to his office.

RELATED: Pay disparity at heart of Saanich schools strike has 45-year-old roots

Gore-Langton said both sides could have resolved the disputes a long time ago and her loyalties lie clearly with the striking support staff, who deserve the same pay as their peers in other school districts.

“Instead they are forced to strike, leaving us parents scrambling to find child care for our children so we can still go to work to pay for these taxes spent on picket lines and out of school care for our kids,” she said.

Both sides have resumed negotiations, but no settlement has been reached yet.


Like us on Facebook and follow @wolfgang_depner

wolfgang.depner@peninsulanewsreview.com

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Motion for Saanich to stand with Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs in pipeline debate postponed

One week delay provides more time to build community support, councillor says

Rain Walk returns Saturday to raise funds for cancer support

Rain Walk group Team Teal indebted to Inspire Health

UPDATED: Pat Bay Highway blockade ends three hours later

About 80 people from four major Peninsula First Nations blocking major highway

Central Saanich Police prepared for afternoon shut-down of Highway 17

Sgt. Paul Brailey questions efficacy of protest

Saanich students get on board Walking School Bus

Rogers Elementary students led by teachers and Saanich Police in new initiative

VIDEO: Province promotes ‘lifting each other up’ on 13th annual Pink Shirt Day in Victoria

Students, MLAs, community members gathered at B.C. Parliament Buildings Wednesday

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers wanted list for the week of Feb. 25

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

Prepare for new coronavirus like an emergency, health minister advises

About 81,000 people around the world have now become ill with COVID-19

B.C. residents in Wet’suwet’en territory have right to police presence: Public Safety Minister

Nevertheless, Bill Blair said officials remain ‘very anxious’ for the barricades to come down

Winnipeg police investigating graffiti on RCMP and other buildings

Manitoba Justice Minister Cliff Cullen denounced the vandalism

B.C. seniors’ watchdog calls for better oversight after recent problems at Retirement Concepts care homes

‘There is no financial incentive right now to be a good operator’ - Isobel Mackenzie

Trucking company fined $175K for Kootenay creek fuel spill

Decision handed down last Friday in Nelson court

B.C. Liberals call for ban on foreign funds to pipeline protesters

Sierra Club, Wilderness Committee back Coastal GasLink blockades

Most Read