Two Canadians, two Americans abducted in Nigeria are freed

Kidnapping for ransom is common in Nigeria, especially on the Kaduna to Abuja highway

Two Canadians and two Americans who were kidnapped in Nigeria’s north-central Kaduna state on Tuesday have been freed and are in good condition, police said Saturday.

Police and a special anti-kidnapping squad rescued the foreigners in the Kagarko local government area Friday night after a massive manhunt, state police commissioner Agyole Abeh said.

“No ransom was paid. It was the efforts of the police through the directives of the Inspector General of Police that led to their release,” he said.

One suspect was arrested in connection with the kidnapping and police were on the trail of remaining suspects, Abeh said.

The foreigners have been taken to the capital, Abuja, Kaduna state police spokesman Mukhtar Aliyu said.

“They are in good condition but due to trauma they have to undergo medical observation.” Aliyu said.

Gunmen ambushed the foreigners Tuesday as they travelled from Kafanchan in Kaduna state to Abuja. Two police escorts were killed in what police called a “fierce gun battle.”

The Americans and Canadians have not been publicly identified. Aliyu earlier said they are investors setting up solar stations in villages around Kafanchan.

Elizabeth Reid, a spokeswoman for Global Affairs Canada, said Canadian officials worked closely on the ground with the Nigerian government.

She said in an email that they have “been in regular contact with the Canadian families and the employer to provide assistance and support.”

Kidnapping for ransom is common in Nigeria, especially on the Kaduna to Abuja highway. Two German archaeologists were seized at gunpoint last year less than 100 kilometres northeast of Abuja and later freed unharmed. Sierra Leone’s deputy high commissioner was taken at gunpoint on the highway in 2016 and held for five days before he was let go.

Victims typically are released unharmed after ransom is paid, though security forces have rescued a few high-profile abductees. A number of bandits, including herdsmen, have been arrested.

Ibrahim Abdul’Aziz and Sam Olukoya, The Associated Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Heat warning issued for Vancouver Island

Temperatures expected to cool down later this week

Saanich seals history with time capsule

Saanich will re-open time capsule in 2067

Short trip to car-free Sidney Spit offers camping, beaches, hikes

Sidney Spit is part of B.C.’s Gulf Islands National Park Reserve, a protected marine ecosystem

Women’s March Victoria keeps movement going with UVic symposium

Discussions, community building and fundraising event highlights women of colour, LGBTQ, immigrants

Canadian military gains valuable disaster experience at RIMPAC

Naval, air force and army personnel practise war activities, humanitarian relief

Royal Victoria Yacht Club sends strong presence to BC Summer Games

Oak Bay athlete Max Chapman competes in sailing this week

Proposed charges will cost Saanich housing affordability

The head of the association representing home builders in the Greater Victoria… Continue reading

B.C. teen meets Nicolas Cage

Filming mob movie in downtown Vernon, B.C.

Critics claim Trump “defended a tyrant”

Trump questions US intel, not Putin, on Russia 2016 meddling

B.C. MLAs choose new children’s watchdog

Jennifer Charlesworth has worked in government, social services

B.C. reporter calls out immigration photo on social media as fake news

A Vancouver reporter is calling out a British politician for spreading fake news

Hundreds of Arctic glaciers shrinking, disappearing

Out of 1,773 glaciers, 1,353 shrank significantly between 2000 and 2016

Indigenous housing providers worried Liberal proposals could put families on the streets

Indigenous housing providers raise alarms about future of federal funding deals

Black Press Media journalists win big at Canadian community newspaper awards

Newsrooms earn recognition for editorial and photography excellence

Most Read