Update: Teens who murdered Kimberly Proctor face adult prison time

A B.C. Supreme Court justice has ruled the two teen boys who raped, tortured and murdered Kimberly Proctor will head to prison as adults.

  • Apr. 4, 2011 6:00 a.m.

The two teen boys who raped



Judge releases names of killers

The teenage killers of Kimberly Proctor will serve mandatory adult sentences of life in prison.

Kruse Wellwood, 17, and Cameron Moffat, 18, were handed matching sentences and their names were released from publication ban in B.C. Supreme Court on Monday.

Both will also serve a five year concurrent sentence for indignity to human remains. Their first opportunity for parole will be in 10 years.

They’re required to submit DNA to criminal databases and will be on the sexual offender registry for life and will never be allowed to possess a restricted firearms.

About 70 people came to the courthouse to hear the verdict, including more than 20 of Proctor’s relatives, many of her high school friends and 10 of the police investigators who worked on the case. The judge’s decision was televised into a second courtroom for the overflow of people who could not make it into the main room.

Speaking to the media outside the courthouse, the victim’s aunt Jo-Anne Landolt said that seeing the offenders in the courtroom brought up rage inside of her.

“I wanted to jump the enclosure and kill them both right there,” she admitted.

However she said at this point, she and her family are trying to find closure.

“If we let what those two monsters did destroy us too, then they’ll have killed more than one person that day,” she said. “Knowing the public is safe from them … at least that’s something.”

The victim’s parents Fred and Lucia thanked police investigators, the public and media who helped bring together the facts for the case.

“I hope they die long, painful deaths,” Fred Proctor said of the killers. “They’re animals.”

Wellwood and Moffat admitted to pre-planning the rape and killing of their classmate on March 18, 2010, and burning her body under a bridge on the Galloping Goose trail the next day.

“In a case as terrible as this one, it’s important not to let revulsion overwhelm the sentencing process,” Justice Robert Johnston said, before laying out the facts that led to his decision to give the teens adult sentences.

Despite the offenders having no previous criminal history, Johnston highlighted their violent pasts and the defiance they routinely showed towards authorities in their homes and at school, as well as the lasting impact of their crime.

“Kimberly Proctor is dead and those who survive her are devastated,” the justice said. “The gulf between this intended killing and normal societal values is enormous and obvious.”

He said it could never be known for certain whether one of the teens was less involved in the most significant acts, but said it’s clear that they were both “full and willing participants.”

He said they will both require significant rehabilitation and if released untreated they would be at a high risk to re-offend.

“We can hope they will take treatment in custody, but that remains to be seen,” he said.

The judge will decide on April 13, after reviewing reports from probation officers, whether Wellwood and Moffat will serve their time in adult prison or remain in the youth custodial facility where they have been held since their June 2010 arrest.

news@goldstreamgazette.com

 

 

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