Brian Bird has been awarded a clerkship at the Supreme Court of Canada next year.

Brian Bird has been awarded a clerkship at the Supreme Court of Canada next year.

UVic grad joins Supreme Court

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  • Jun. 24, 2011 3:00 p.m.

At just 23, Brian Bird may not yet possess the wisdom that comes with age but he may need to prove he’s wise beyond his years at his new job.

Meet one of the Supreme Court of Canada’s newest hires.

The recent University of Victoria law grad said he’s excited to be joining the ranks of former deputy prime minister John Manley and former B.C. attorney general Geoff Plant when he begins a one-year clerkship at the country’s highest court in Ottawa next year.

And while September 2012 is still a long way off, Bird will be honing his legal research and writing skills in the meantime as a clerk at the B.C. Supreme Court in New Westminster beginning in August.

“The Supreme Court of Canada clerkship is kind of like the crown jewel for law students,” said Bird, who graduated from UVic with a bachelor of laws just a few weeks ago. “So, to be completely honest, I didn’t think I’d even be in the competition for it, given how competitive it is.”

But in the hunt he was – beating out more than 170 applicants from across the country and being hand-picked for the job by Supreme Court Justice Louise Charron.

Although the court hires its clerks a full year and a half in advance, Bird said he didn’t get word that his application had even been accepted until just two weeks before his interview in Ottawa.

“There were people there interviewing with five or six different judges that day,” Bird said.

“I only got one interview and to get even one was an absolute honour.”

And so, spending less than 24 hours in the capital, Bird met with Justice Charron and impressed her enough that she hired him to be the trusted right-hand of her Supreme Court replacement when Charron retires at the end of the summer.

He won’t be the only one: each of the nine Supreme Court judges hires three clerks – from a pool of more than 200 applicants. And once hired, the clerks must also undergo and successfully pass a security clearance and swear an oath of public service.

“It’s a big, big responsibility,” Bird said.

He will be responsible for researching and summarizing case law, preparing memos and offering his legal opinion on interpretations of laws as they pertain to the most pressing and important legal questions of our time.

“One of the first things one of my friends said to me was, ‘Congratulations Brian, are you scared?’ And I had certainly thought about that but scared isn’t the right word. I certainly have an understanding of the responsibility that comes along with it, especially at the Supreme Court of Canada, and I’m excited for it.”

As for his plans after the back-to-back stints at the superior courts of British Columbia and Canada, Bird said he hopes to return to post-secondary for graduate studies and plans to eventually teach law at the university level.

editor@saanichnews.com