West Shore RCMP are looking for a man suspected of using stolen information to spend $6,000 in fraudulent purchases and attempt at taking out a loan. (Courtesy of West Shore RCMP)

West Shore RCMP are looking for a man suspected of using stolen information to spend $6,000 in fraudulent purchases and attempt at taking out a loan. (Courtesy of West Shore RCMP)

West Shore RCMP release suspect image after fraudster spent $6,000 of victim’s money

Fraud revealed during investigation of massive fraud and identity operation

West Shore RCMP is asking the public to help them identify a suspect in a case where someone spent $6,000 using a victim’s information.

The RCMP’s Crime Reduction Unit has been working through evidence uncovered in a massive identity theft and fraud operation on Vancouver Island. Police discovered the operation in September after a used car dealership in Colwood reported a fraudulent bank draft had been used to buy a car.

The evidence from that operation was connected to 25 unsolved frauds and thefts over the past two years.

One of those was an unsolved fraud from November 2019, when personal identification that had been stolen from a parked vehicle was allegedly used to gain access to the victim’s bank accounts.

READ ALSO: West Shore RCMP arrest two, find 1,000 pieces of stolen ID in Langford

Over a two-month span, the suspect fraudulently accessed over $6,000 and attempted to secure a loan in the victims name for thousands of dollars.

Police have photos of a suspect and are hoping the public can help them identify him.

He is described as a Caucasian male in his 30s, wearing a black pullover Nike brand windbreaker with a blue and white toque.

Anyone who can identify the suspect is asked to call West Shore RCMP at 250-474-2264 or report anonymously by calling Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

READ ALSO: Sooke man facing fraud charges after wallet stolen from vehicle


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