Canada must not repeat mistakes on immigration

It’s time for reassessment of both Canada’s planned fighting-force reduction and rapid refugee immigration

Re: We can’t let terrorists destroy our humanity, Saanich News (Nov. 20). The editorially expressed aspirational goals, regretfully, appear to support a soft misguided national response to international Muslim terrorism.

The performance in Paris Nov. 13 by the presciently-named “The Eagles of Death Metal” American rock group saw 89 people killed in a terrorist assault by members of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS). The total killed by ISIS in their multiple concurrent assaults in an aptly named “mass terrorist attack” was 130. It is past time to vigorously deal with the cause of what was, to a degree, a self-inflicted European disaster.

A correct and emotionally charged summation of the vast majority of the terrorist problems Europeans face is that they are “caused by Muslims.” Such a simplistic assessment is dangerously attractive, but it must be remembered that the vast majority of refugees flooding into Europe are Muslims who are economic refugees, of which many are also considered apostates by Muslim extremists (aka terrorists). Such double jeopardy may, to a degree, justify the flexible immigration policy of some European countries.

Our federal government’s stated goal is to authorize and settle in multiple cross-country locations some 25,000 refugees from the Middle East. What cannot be overstressed is the need for Canada to not repeat the mistakes of multiple European Union countries whose relaxed immigration policy, combined with their current open-door refugee intake, has resulted in an ongoing terrorist crisis. There’s a high risk associated with fast-tracking immigrants from the Middle-East.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s recent claim that “we’ll continue to engage with our allies around the world in ensuring the safety of Canadians and others both here at home and around the world” may be about to become meaningless.

Regretfully, Trudeau’s government has announced its intent to withdraw our only actual combat force of six CF-18 fighter jets (and two support aircraft) contribution to counter the ISIS threat. Any withdrawal of this modest force will be seen by both our NATO partners and G20 colleagues for what it is: a cut-and-run withdrawal.

The Canadian Liberal Party “Sunny Ways” election mantra is now passé. It’s time for reassessment of both Canada’s planned fighting-force reduction in, and rapid refugee immigration from, the Middle East.

Ron Johnson

 

Saanich

 

 

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