Canada’s economic future tied to resource sector

Environmental worries ignore levels of federal bureaucracy

We are living in a strange and rapidly changing world, where countries are on the brink of default on their huge debts.

While anti-federal government voices are heard almost daily, Canada is hopefully on track to avoid the Greek-style tragedy unfolding in Europe. Our resource sector, the economic engine presently keeping Canada afloat, will be our saviour in a world where the options are few.

Canadians are being force fed the idea that Canada will now have no environmental watchdogs or safeguards. All that with a minor reduction in government spending. That seems a little odd to me.

I also do not think Prime Minister Stephen Harper, who has been vilified by so many, has instructed the various government agencies where they should make cuts.

Many environmental regulations were too restrictive and cumbersome before the proposed budget bill changes. They caused legitimate resource development to be indefinitely stalled or reviewed out of being. The problem of governments tending to over-legislate to justify their own existence is common.

The stakes are high. Because of our natural resources and energy reserves, Canada has the unique ability to survive in a world where manufacturing is being sucked into the black hole we call China. There is no stopping this deindustrialization of the west. If Canada can survive with our standard of living mostly intact, we will be one of the few developed countries to do so.

Canada can be a society that uses its financial resources to care for our rapidly aging population and have some significant influence internationally. Or, we can fade into economic obscurity, adrift and unable to finance our social programs, health care and educational systems.

In that scenario, Canada could have little or no affect on the world; another welfare state looking for handouts.

Bill Wilson

Saanichton

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