EDITORIAL: February the time to see red

Breast cancer campaigners keep up awareness, but other campaigns need help too

Hot on the heels of Pink in the Rink, a fundraiser held by the Victoria Royals hockey team supporting the B.C. Cancer Foundation, the UVic Vikes men’s and women’s basketball team is hosting its sixth annual Shoot for the Cure – another pink-themed cancer fundraiser, this one to benefit the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation.

We see them everywhere, small pink ribbons on a lapel here, larger ones stuck to the back of a car there: pink pens, pink water bottles, pink gloves, pink T-shirts, pink bracelets, pink socks, hats and even golf bags. We see them all every day and know the money spent to purchase them – at least some of it – went to support breast cancer research.

It’s a campaign that works.

Breast cancer deaths have decreased by almost 40 per cent since the peak in 1986, mainly due to earlier detection through regular mammography screening, advances in screening technology, and improved treatments – all a result of better funding and increased awareness, no doubt.

Cancer is a truly horrible disease. Every hour of every day, an average of 21 Canadians will be diagnosed with some type of cancer, and nine people will die from cancer, according to the Canadian Cancer Society.

However, heart disease and stroke kill seven times as many women as breast cancer.

While pink is trendy and a great way to show you support a cause, this month is Heart Month, time dedicated to fundraising and awareness for the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

Heart disease and stroke take one life every seven minutes and 90 per cent of Canadians have at least one risk factor, according to the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

So while pink gets all the attention, now is the time to see red and remind ourselves that, unlike most cancers, heart disease is something we can prevent.

Just Posted

Saanich jam stand at the centre of controversy prepares to close

Staff review of roadside stand legislation too late for Little

Convicted drug trafficker asks Victoria courtroom for chance to ‘turn this around’

Horst Schirmer sentenced for convictions on five counts of possession related to trafficking

$11 million overdraw for McKenzie Interchange construction

The project has been delayed multiple times and is now estimating a budget of $96 million

Alzheimer Society calls for helpline volunteers in Greater Victoria

Charity is in ‘urgent need’ as calls on the rise

Pipeline protestors plan march as Trudeau gives Trans Mountain the go-ahead,

20 kilometre march to protest the pipeline starts in Victoria, ends on Saanich Peninsula

VIDEO: Trans Mountain expansion project gets green light, again

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced the decision in Ottawa on Tuesday afternoon

POLL: Do you support the government’s decision to approve the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion?

The federal government announced Tuesday its approval for the Trans Mountain pipeline… Continue reading

Greater Victoria wanted list for the week of June 18

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

Man to be sentenced for sexual abuse of young girl in Nanaimo

Stephen Mark Castleden also sentenced for child pornography-related charges

MPs hear retired B.C. nurse’s petition to change compensation for fatal medical errors

Teri McGrath wants provinces to implement no-fault system for medical errors

Horgan says he’ll still defend B.C. coast after second Trans Mountain approval

Meanwhile, one B.C. First Nation has announced plans for a legal challenge

VIDEO: Firefighters stop blaze from spreading after BMW crashes at Saratoga Speedway

Victoria-based businessmen were ‘corner training’ on Father’s Day when incident took place

Demonstrators on either side of Trans Mountain debate clash in Vancouver

Crowd heard from member of Indigenous-led coalition that hopes to buy 51% of expansion project

Grieving B.C. mom hopes Facebook message leads to new investigation into son’s Surrey homicide

Criminal Justice Branch didn’t lay charges, concluding no substantial likelihood of murder or manslaughter conviction

Most Read