EDITORIAL: Stop crapping on Esquimalt

Small municipality getting short end of sewage treatment stick

The uproar in Esquimalt the past week may well have been heard across the Juan de Fuca Strait, where pro-sewage treatment advocates are watching every move we make on the project.

News that the Capital Regional District is considering a site in the Esquimalt industrial park for a planned biosolids processing facility, to go with the main treatment plant on the Esquimalt waterfront, left residents and nearby property owners feeling they had been crapped on yet again.

CRD core area liquid waste management committee chair Denise Blackwell’s comments that a biosolids plant on Viewfield Road would save between $6 million and $7 million annually in operating costs over a plant built at Hartland were telling. Regardless if the $17-million land purchase was speculative, the decision shows which way the committee is leaning.

That a consultation process is being planned to help the CRD choose between the two sites is small consolation to the property owners in the Viewfield neighbourhood, which touches on Esquimalt and Victoria.

Given its siting, the McLoughlin Point treatment plant is likely to have less of a deleterious effect on property values than a biosolids plant on Viewfield, even if the smell and noise are well contained.

Both residential and industrial values are bound to drop as a result of last week’s news, in the short term at least. Whether the CRD ultimately chooses to locate the biosolids plant there or not, the damage may already be done.

Could all this have been avoided? Hard to say. Municipal land dealings are always done behind closed doors as a matter of course. And the biosolids plant, which may well have a smaller environmental footprint than the existing trucking warehouse on Viewfield, has to be built somewhere.

The CRD, duty-bound to spend taxpayers’ money wisely, no doubt felt compelled to snap up a property it believed could be an ideal site, especially when it could save millions.

But it better be ready for further outcry, and potential legal action, as the shit really has hit the fan in Esquimalt for a second time.

Just Posted

Victoria Beer Week celebrates ‘five years of cheers’

Nine day craft beer festival delves into home brew workshops, food pairings, and a road trip to Sooke

Transit open houses on better Peninsula bus service

SIDNEY — Improved BC Transit services to West Sidney and to the… Continue reading

Victoria Orchid Society hosts 30th annual show

Orchids in full bloom March 3 and 4 at Our Lady of Fatima Hall

Free public lecture timed with scientific meeting in Sidney

Oceanographer Gregory Johnson speaks on the robots that monitor ocean temperature and salinity

Victoria playing host to regional farm market conference

Food industry experts to attend three-day networking event, which is open to the public

The 2018 B.C. Games wrap up in Kamloops

The B.C. Winter Games comes to a close after a weekend of fun and excitment

Student Voice: Phones in school a tool for learning or weapon of mass distraction?

Spectrum student questions role of smart phones in school

Spectrum to stage Dirty Rotten Scoundrels

Students having fun with laughs in Broadway musical

B.C. boosts support for former youth in government care

More support coming for rent, child care and health care while they go back to school

Saanich skater golden at B.C. Winter Games

Desiree Grubell takes gold, Emily Walzak silver in Special Olympics figure skating.

SMUS stages Catch Me If You Can, the true tale of a con-artist

Musical follows tales of impersonator Frank Abagnale Jr.

B.C. VIEWS: Our not-so-New Democrats don’t rock the boat

Finance Minister Carole James takes the wheel, steers similar course

Concert-goers unfazed by Hedley sexual misconduct allegations

Frontman Jacob Hoggard thanked fans from the ‘bottom of our hearts’ at Halifax’s Scotiabank Centre

Original B.C. Games participant-turned-sensei officiating 39 years later

Langley judo sensei was a competitor at the inaugural B.C. Winter Games 40 years ago

Most Read