EDITORIAL: Timing is right for transit study

Hopefully move will help find efficiencies needed to entice more drivers to use transit

The move by the Greater Victoria Transit Commission to study five high-traffic volume sections over the next year, with an eye to making them more efficient, is good news for transportation in the Capital Region.

The $250,000 study is the kind of expense and planning activity we expect the transit commission to engage in as a way to improve its product and reduce delays for passengers.

Taking action on the final recommendations, in co-operation with municipal and provincial governments, will go a long way toward helping B.C. Transit with another of its constant struggles.

That challenge? Convincing more of the thousands of people who still drive to and from work daily that the perceived or real inconvenience of not having their car readily available outweighs the pain of creeping along in traffic twice a day. That, of course, also assumes that the cost of taking transit is comparable or even less than driving.

For those who oversee and plan transit in the Capital Region, that objective must be reached to a significant degree before any work begins on building a light-rail transit system.

Like the Kevin Costner character in the movie Field of Dreams, who was told by baseball spirits to “build it and they will come,” the transit commission is banking on the notion that people will leave their cars at home in far greater numbers once LRT is in place.

Even when (or if) LRT comes to Greater Victoria, it’s not as if the bus system will play second fiddle to rail.

In fact, the bus system will be more important than ever as the public finds new ways to connect with the LRT.

Looking for ways to make the current system more efficient and user-friendly just makes sense as a way to ramp up its capacity – the ability to move more passengers in the same amount of time or less – and overall ridership in the years leading up to the addition of LRT to the regional transit system.

Just Posted

Over 200 lives saved in first year at Victoria’s supervised consumption site

The Harbour celebrates its first anniversary with a report of zero deaths on site

Greater Victoria group helps low-income, at-risk seniors stay safe

Victoria chapter of 100+ Women Who Care donate $30,300 to Eldercare Foundation

Views, brews and food on Gulf Islands craft beer cruise

Five day cruise from Sidney to Gulf Islands, includes chef and beer historian

Saanich Mayor says ‘no costs asked of municipality’ for proposed film studio

Mayor Fred Haynes made that comment after questions from watchdog group

RCMP confirm foul play in death of 60-year-old Metchosin man

Police believe crime an isolated incident

VIDEO: Dashcam video captures moment Victoria cyclist struck

Police seeking cyclist captured in video

ICBC insurance renewals get more complicated this year

Crash history, driver risk prompt more reporting requirements

High-speed rail link would run from Vancouver to Seattle in under 1 hour: study

Annual ridership is projected to exceed three million

B.C. man dies from rabies after contact with Vancouver Island bat

Last known case of human rabies in B.C. was 16 years ago

U.S. tug firm to be sentenced for 2016 spill in B.C. First Nation’s territory

The Nathan E. Stewart spilled 110,000 litres of diesel and heavy oils in October 2016

Asylum figures show overall slower rate of irregular crossings into Canada

Between January and June 2019, a total of 6,707 asylum seekers crossed irregularly into Canada

Wolves not gnawing into Island’s prey population

Forestry practices, not predation, blamed for reduced numbers in prey animals

Youth seen with gun at Nanaimo mall, suspect now in custody

Woodgrove Centre shut down during police incident

Crown recommends up to two-year jail term for former Bountiful leader

Crown says sentence range should be 18 months to two years for Bountiful child removal case

Most Read