Local politicians vote on resolutions at last week's Union of B.C. Municipalities convention in Vancouver.

Local politicians vote on resolutions at last week's Union of B.C. Municipalities convention in Vancouver.

Inner children take over city hall

The David Suzuki Foundation's 'environmental bill of rights' is embraced by those who prefer feelings to facts

We’re seeing the effects of our post-literate, feelings-based education system and media on the federal election. Candidate bozo eruptions are becoming more frequent.

Most recently a Liberal candidate on Vancouver Island admitted she has long believed that hijacked jetliners could not have destroyed the World Trade Centre on 9-11, that it was all “a lie.” That was “my truth,” she said, in the lingo of the feelings-first, inner-child crowd.

Now she’s “moved on” to a slightly different fact-free conclusion, that we’ll just never know how those 3,000 people were murdered. And she wanted to go to Ottawa and help run this country.

Feelings-based beliefs were on display again at last week’s Union of B.C. Municipalities convention in Vancouver, where bozo eruptions by local politicians come in bunches.

This year’s main outbreak was an emotional demand that the B.C. government enact a provincial “bill of rights” to protect the environment. This magic municipal Magna Carta “recognizes the right of every resident to live in a healthy environment, including the right to clean air, clean water and vibrant ecosystems.”

Alert taxpayers may wonder, how many lawyers would it take to define “vibrant”? More on that in a moment.

Local councils across B.C. and around the country have been pitched this scheme by the David Suzuki Foundation, which calls it the Blue Dot campaign. In short, it’s part of the bigger plan to save the planet by crushing capitalism, currently being pushed by the Pope, the UN and others.

Victoria Mayor Lisa Helps was one of the most passionate backers. She quoted the plea presented to her council by an 11-year-old recruited by the Blue Dot team.

There are many such children, terrified by indoctrination about the imminent destruction of Earth and all its cuddly creatures that has bombarded them since they learned to speak. They are found in the wealthiest countries in human history, those enjoying health, comfort, opportunity and environmental laws not imagined 50 years ago.

In the vast, air-conditioned hall of the Vancouver Convention Centre, there were several attempts at adult supervision.

Coquitlam Coun. Terry O’Neill noted that unlike intrinsic rights articulated in Canada’s charter, freedom of assembly and so forth, this is an attempt to invent new rights that are actually demands for “others to do something for you.”

Indeed, if we’re going to have government by 11-year-olds, we might as well throw in a right to free ice cream.

Chilliwack Mayor Sharon Gaetz went off on a rant about how this new “vision” would protect us from things like Volkswagen fiddling its diesel fuel emission results.

The resolution calls for “access to justice when environmental rights are infringed,” which sounds like code for some sort of costly new legal aid program to pursue every individual grievance.

Meanwhile in the real world, class action lawsuits are being prepared to gain compensation for lost resale value of millions of cars. This is what happens in fortunate places like Canada that already have access to justice.

O’Neill read off a long list of existing B.C. legislation that protects water, air, wildlife, food, public health and so on. Helps replied that this bill of rights would “consolidate” all that. One more layer of bureaucracy, that’s the Victoria spirit.

Williams Lake Mayor Walt Cobb pleaded with rural delegates to reject this “David Suzuki propaganda” that is designed to put more roadblocks in the way of the very resource industries that provide our modern comforts.

Alas, the resolution passed in a show of hands that should have been, but wasn’t, put to a counted vote.

Tom Fletcher is legislature reporter and columnist for Black Press. Twitter: @tomfletcherbc

Just Posted

An eastern cottontail rabbit on the UVic campus. (Evert Lindquist/News Staff)
Wild rabbits persist at the University of Victoria

Feral rabbits are still absent, but another non-native species has arrived on campus

This conceptual rendering shows revisions to the proposed warehouse in Sidney on land under the authority of the Victoria Airport Authority. York Realty, which plans to build, then lease the building, said significant changes to the the massing and height of the building respond to community feedback. Additional feedback can be submitted until June 30. (Screencap/York Realty)
Sidney warehouse proposal lands Greater Victoria Chamber of Commerce endorsement

Public has until June 30 to submit additional comments after significant modifications

Staff will be reviewing public feedback from second-stage designs for cycling infrastructure in James Bay, part of the City of Victoria’s 32-kilometre network. (Black Press Media file photo)
Victoria sends James Bay bike lanes choice to next phase

Design modifications based on community input to be delivered to council this summer

Greater father involvement in the home leads to improved childhood development and increased marital satisfaction, says expert. (Black Press Media file photo)
University of Victoria researcher finds lack of father involvement a drag on gender equality

Working women still taking on most child and household duties in Canada

New COVID-19 cases on Vancouver Island by local health area for the week of June 6-12. (B.C. Centre for Disease Control image)
New COVID-19 cases up on Island, but health officials say trends going right way

There were 22 new COVID-19 cases in Greater Victoria last week after just four the week before

People line up to get their COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination centre, Thursday, June 10, 2021 in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
Vaccines, low COVID case counts increase Father’s Day hope, but risk is still there

Expert says people will have to do their own risk calculus before popping in on Papa

(Black Press Media file photo)
POLL: When was the last time you visited the mainland?

The films are again lighting the screens at local theatres, the wine… Continue reading

Anyone with information on any of these individuals is asked to call 1-800-222-TIPS (8477) or visit the website victoriacrimestoppers.ca for more information.
Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers wanted list for the week of June 15

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

The Co-op gas station at Whiskey Creek is burning after a camper van exploded while refueling just before 4 p.m. on Thursday, June 17, 2021. (FACEBOOK PHOTO)
Exploding camper van torches Highway 4 gas station between Qualicum Beach and Port Alberni

Highway traffic blocked after Whiskey Creek gas station erupts into flames

Helen Austin performing with Trent Freeman at the 2018 Vancouver Island MusicFest. Austin is one of the many performers listed for the 2021 event.
Vancouver Island MusicFest goes virtual for 2021

Black Press to stream 25 hours of programming July 9-11

FILE – A science class at L.A. Matheson Secondary in Surrey, B.C. on March 12, 2021. (Lauren Collins/Surrey Now Leader)
Teachers’ union wants more COVID transmission data as B.C. prepares for back-to-school

BCTF says that details will be important as province works on plan for September

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry outlines B.C.’s COVID-19 restart plan, May 25, 2021, including larger gatherings and a possible easing of mandatory masks on July 1. (B.C. government photo)
B.C. records 120 new COVID-19 cases, second vaccines accelerating

Lower Pfizer deliveries for early July, Moderna shipments up

A Heffley Creek peacock caught not one - but two - lifts on a logging truck this month. (Photo submitted)
Heffley Creek-area peacock hops logging trucks in search of love

Peacock hitched two lifts in the past month

The Calgary skyline is seen on Friday, Sept. 15, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
2 deaths from COVID-19 Delta variant in Alberta, 1 patient was fully immunized

Kerry Williamson with Alberta Health Services says the patients likely acquired the virus in the hospital

Most Read