LETTER: Illegal dumping has been solved elsewhere in Canada

Montreal's Ecocentres allow residents to drop off larger furniture and other items normally abandoned on street corners

Re: The perpetual headache of ‘free-cycling,’ (News, Aug. 15)

I moved to Saanich two years ago from Montreal. I thought that the illegal dumping was bad in Montreal, but Victoria is by far much worse.

I was not surprised once I learned how much it costs to dispose of large items in this city.

One thing Montreal did have, which probably curbed a lot of street dumping, was Ecocentres.

These are municipal depots that were designed to reduce the volume of waste sent to the landfill.

They accepted all kinds of material from concrete, wood and other construction materials to mattresses, paint cans, appliances, batteries and furniture.

Anything that was still usable was sent to an area where it was sold as-is. The rest was recycled. Drop-off for residents was free.

There were restrictions as to how much was allowed per household per year, but in all the years I used them, I was never turned away or charged for dumping.

Your driver’s licence was checked and logged on entry. Commercial dumpers were charged, the balance of the service was financed from municipal taxes.

But that doesn’t help anyone without access to a truck or strong backs to move the material.

Twice a year, there was large garbage pick-up.

On the appointed dates, large garbage left at the end of your driveway would be picked up, free of charge. Any other time, you could schedule a pick-up, for a fee, and the city would send an inspector to assess the cost. If you agreed to the price they would send a truck and haul it away.

Increased costs in municipal taxes to fund an Ecocentre-type scheme certainly won’t be popular with residents, but “free” drop off and a yearly large garbage pick-up would probably curb most of the illegal dumping.

Let’s face it: your broken down furniture, even with a “free” sign on it, is still garbage.

David Gerard

Saanich

 

 

Just Posted

Plans in place for Cordova Bay commercial development

Staff approve proposal for 91 residential units and 46,797 commercial space for Cordova Bay

UPDATE: Island Health says no need for alarm over needle prick incidents in Victoria

Briefing followed meeting between Island Health, downtown service providers

Victoria a hot spot for millennials: new study

City ranks No. 2 for generation of Canadians seeking work-life balance

Rumble in the Vale: Strawberry Vale homeowners hang banner protesting construction noise, rumbling

Banner reading ‘Do you hear what we hear?’ hangs over Colwood Crawl

B.C. cougar kitten rescued after mother struck by vehicle

Conservation Officers find home for young kitten found dehydrated and frostbitten near Williams Lake

Richmond, Uplands will need seismic upgrades to reopen

Richmond elementary could be replaced with new building, if needed

B.C. out of the running for Amazon’s next headquarters

Toronto is the only Canadian city left in the running despite the province backing Metro Vancouver’s bid for new Amazon headquarters

B.C. hockey player nominated for Hobey Baker Award

Myles Powell is a forward at Rochester Institute of Technology

Post interest rate hike debt tips

What to do about your debt and mortgages after the interest rate hike

Foreign workers sleeping in Alberta Burger King basement

Alberta Health Services said its inspectors found foreign workers sleeping in the basement of the Lethbridge restaurant

Court application halts release of bread price-fixing documents

Bread price-fixing documents won’t be unsealed Thursday, Loblaw says

Pharrell and N.E.R.D to headline NBA All-Star halftime show

11-time Grammy winner Pharrell and his hip hop-rock band N.E.R.D. will headline the halftime show at the 2018 NBA All-Star game in Los Angeles

Heritage Minister wants zero tolerance for harassment in entertainment industry

Heritage Minister Melanie Joly had two meetings to discuss harassment in the film, TV and theatre worlds

Most Read