LETTER: Saanich confused about its trees

Tree protection bylaw requiring permits for tree removal will be a burden on elderly and poor

Re: Tree tally leads to new rules (News, July 9)

Saanich’s tree removal restrictions act against human life while not achieving the ends that environmentalist politicians want.

For example, why is Western red cedar protected but Himalayan cedar not? (Using the list in your August 22, 2014 issue. Western red “cedar”, a member of the Cypress/Juniper family, is common here whereas Himalayan “cedar”, in the Larch branch of the Pine family, is not. (Himalayan cedar is a large tree that looks like Western hemlock from a distance, it’s closely related to Lebanon cedar.)

Having to get a permit especially burdens elderly and poor people struggling to stay in their homes while at risk of a tree puncturing their roof in a wet winter night.

Saanich’s restrictions work against planting trees near houses, because they will be a future burden to the property owner including the cost of necessary removal for either the planting property owner or a subsequent owner who may not want to pay as much due to assuming that cost.

Saanich’s restrictions smell like another do-gooder scheme by people who have the negative view of humans that comes from Marxist teachings. They act as though they’ve never looked outside and seen that people plant trees which grow, and that many break apart due structural deficiency or rot, or die due to disease or old age. (Indeed, it is known in Saanich that one type of tree breaks in calm summer heat.)

Meanwhile Saanich’s bureaucracy can’t even get tree selection right – they’ve planted a large species in narrow strips of grass along the recently rebuilt part of Admirals Road.

Voters should ask questions this fall.

Keith Sketchley

Saanich

 

Just Posted

Ferry passenger on Sidney boat rescue: ‘It was like the Titanic’

Lone boater rescued by BC Ferries, who called the incident a ‘close call’

One year later, life is much different in Saanich for the Bui family

‘We still hear cars screeching at the intersection,’ says mom of Leila Bui

Strike averted at Greater Victoria Public Library

CUPE and labour relations association representing the GVPL reach tentative agreement

District of Central Saanich pays a living wage

The living wage in Greater Victoria is $20.50 an hour

Man rescued from sinking boat off the coast of Sidney

Mayday call came into Coast Guard saying vessel had taken on water, BC Ferries dispatched to scene

Victoria Canadian Tire replaces toys stolen from Salvation Army

Children won’t have to go without toys this Christmas

READER POLL: Do you have turkey or ham for Christmas dinner?

What are you having for Christmas dinner? Canadians gobbled up 3.3 million… Continue reading

Trump signs order to create US Space Command

President Donald Trump signs an executive order to create a U.S. Space Command.

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers wanted list for the week of Dec. 18, 2018

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

Groups preparing new pipeline legal challenge, argue government’s mind made up

A Vancouver-based environment charity is readying itself to go back to court if the federal government reapproves the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion.

Notorious Toronto triple killer gets third consecutive life sentence

Dellen Millard gets third consecutive life sentence for father’s death.

‘Subdued’ housing market predicted in B.C. through 2021: report

The Central 1 Credit Union report predicts “rising but subdued sales” over the next three years, with little movement in median home prices.

$2.2M in cash for Christmas for 106 Greater Victoria charities

Victoria Foundation issues community grants ahead of the holidays

A journey through 2018’s top pop culture moments

Was there any pop culture this year? Of course there was.

Most Read