LETTERS: Trudeau needs to pay heed to climate scientists

How many scientists does it take to convince world leaders that we are on a fast track to the point of no return?

Evidently, even 11,253 world-class climate scientists joining forces to declare “clearly and unequivocally that planet Earth is facing a climate emergency,” is not a strong enough warning to convince our politicians to pull their heads out of the sand.

No paycheque, no power, no position is worth the untold damage we are doing to our planet. We have the science, the skills and the budget to end our dependency on the extraction economy, and instead, replace it with a Green New Deal that would create good jobs in a planet-friendly environment. The only thing missing for this transition is the political will.

Sometime in the next few months, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s cabinet will be making a decision about The Frontier Mine project, Teck Resources’ largest tar sands mine in Canada.

Considering Mr. Trudeau’s position on other fossil fuel projects, despite his party’s lies that they are working hard for the climate, my guess is that Mr. Trudeau will welcome this project with open arms.

This project will require the destruction of thousands of hectares of old-growth forests, lead to the permanent loss of 14,000 hectares of wetlands, and destroy critical fish habitat, not to mention releasing an insane amount of carbon pollution into the atmosphere. Our planet simply cannot sustain this level of destruction.

I know that Mr. Trudeau is well educated but, when it comes to the environment, I think he needs to pay heed to the climate scientists. We don’t have time for mistakes the size of Frontier Mine.

We need to act now if our children are to have a planet to call home.

Jessica Duncan

Victoria

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Indigenous youth arrested during 15-hour occupation to hold press conference Wednesday morning

The speakers are expected to condemn police, RCMP actions towards Indigenous people

Southern resident orca L41 considered missing and feared dead

The orca was last spotted in Aug. 2019 when photographed in western Strait of Juan de Fuca

Sap thief taps Saanich park maple trees, faces hefty fine

One tree found with four taps in Mount Doug Park

VIDEO: Saanich family competes on first season of ‘Family Feud Canada’

Charania family will face off against the Torres family from Hamilton, Ont.

Oak Bay confirms first heritage conservation area

Heritage bylaw for The Prospect neighbourhood in final phase

B.C. reports first coronavirus in Vancouver region

First patient visited Wuhan, China, reported symptoms

POLL: Are you concerned about the coronavirus?

The coronavirus which has sparked concern around the globe has now arrived… Continue reading

Greater Victoria’s wanted list for the week of Jan. 28

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

Off-duty Nanaimo Mountie takes down would-be ice cream thief

Suspect attempted to steal Dilly Bars from Dairy Queen location on Sunday

Nanaimo man hit with pole in dispute over off-leash dog

RCMP say no charges recommended at this time

Was there a tornado on Vancouver Island Monday?

Suspected phone app glitch gives eerie warning

Work has started on Malahat Skywalk, expected completion in 2021

$15-million project expected to open in spring, 2021

B.C. reports first coronavirus in Vancouver region

First patient visited Wuhan, China, reported symptoms

Sooke Minor Fastball to host coaching clinic

Clinic ideal for those planning to coach U6 to U18 teams

Most Read