Practicality and cost effectiveness should be governing factors

I am pleased to see the Saanich News take on the sewage treatment issue

I am pleased to see the Saanich News take on the sewage treatment issue. In my view, investigative reporting on this issue is long overdue.

I am surprised Saanich councillors Susan Brice and Judy Brownoff didn’t support the final option, nor Victoria Coun. Geoff Young and Oak Bay Mayor Nils Jensen. I read Coun. Young didn’t like the idea of digging up Cook Street to get the untreated sewage to Rock Bay, so why not avoid that and use Clover Point?

I did ask Mayor Jensen at the first open house at the Ocean Pointe to clarify the McLoughlin Point zoning. He confirmed that it was initially approved, but a variance was needed as none of the engineering firms could fit the plant on it. They need site coverage of at least four per cent less. So if there are two plants, one fits there.

I think the CRD directors should have turned the whole issue over to the engineers and let them decide what is most practical and cost effective. I am against pumping or transporting sludge to Hartland and I think we should be able to use the treated Class “A” sludge.

The CRD needs to explain the sludge treatment facility at the Viewfield Road property. I was told at a previous open house by an engineer that the CRD banned local use of the treated sludge (it seems to be the same view on organic waste).

I also question the need for long outfalls after the sewage is treated even to the secondary level. I think that needs to be explained. I think board members have themselves too involved in the solution to treatment. Practicality and cost effectiveness should govern. We have what we have, now show us what we can do with it.

Considering future growth in the western communities, I would plan for a plant there. They should at least reserve a site, if not construct a plant that could be enlarged.

On Clover Point, I suspect the point is actually rock that was filled to level it.  Could we not raise the level part?

Paul L. Bishop

Saanich

 

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