A tanker approaches Westridge terminal in Burnaby, where crude oil and refined fuels have been delivered since 1954. One reader writes that halting the pipeline twinning project could have major effects on the economy.                                Courtesy Kinder Morgan Canada

A tanker approaches Westridge terminal in Burnaby, where crude oil and refined fuels have been delivered since 1954. One reader writes that halting the pipeline twinning project could have major effects on the economy. Courtesy Kinder Morgan Canada

Rejecting pipeline project risks alienating future investors

Our dependence on fossil fuels not likely going away anytime soon

Kinder Morgan has spent millions and has undergone four years of government review and public scrutiny to have the pipeline project approved by both the federal and previous provincial governments, only to have the current B.C. government attempt to scuttle the agreement.

If Canada fails to honour this agreement, companies will not risk investing here in future and our economy will suffer. Private business investment creates the wealth, jobs, and prosperity for all Canadians; and the tax revenues for government to provide needed public services and benefits that Canadians expect and that politicians promise. Governments do not create wealth.

Whether we like it or not, it is likely that our dependence on oil will continue for decades to come. Canada’s economy is tied to exporting our natural resources and expanding our markets to reduce our dependence on the United States market, especially in view of the current climate of protectionism by our neighbours.

While we have had a good record for marine safety, it is understandable that residents of the south coast of B.C. have concerns about the potential for shipping accidents from increased marine traffic. We live on the water on south Vancouver Island and appreciate the need to keep our environment safe while accepting a degree of risk.

The federal government is responsible for ports and other provinces must have access. The feds have clearly accepted their role in safety and response for accidents and related oil spill cleanups. Current modern oil tankers have double hulls and state of the art navigation systems and the federal governments must ensure compliance and safety. We must hold them accountable.

Robert Brown

Victoria

Kinder Morgan