Road rage incidents prompted by ‘enforcers’

Changing our attitude when on the road is key to avoiding angry incidents

Re: Slow drivers present greatest hazard (Letters, June 1)

R. Chong’s response to “Keep pressuring high-risk drivers” (Our View, June 1) was right on point.

In the editorial, road rage, among other problems, is mentioned. If one could quantify the number of reckless driving and road-rage incidents attributable to raised frustration levels caused by “self-appointed enforcers” futzing about, or sheer bloody mindedness, one would probably not be surprised at the statistics.

There are always people who will flout the law, but that is for the police to deal with.

But, to speak the unspeakable, road rage doesn’t just happen. It is a reaction to an action, and there are many actions on the Pat Bay Highway that produce “high-risk” behaviour in a normally calm, low-risk driver.

There is much more to this, of course, but what a great beginning.

As the letter-writer suggested, a slight change in attitude is in order.

Kim Shepherd

Saanichton