Seals have been nosed out of the oceans by whales, so is the blue-light advantage offered by the new Johnson Street Bridge such a bad thing, reader asks. Photo by Robert W. Harwood

Seals have been nosed out of the oceans by whales, so is the blue-light advantage offered by the new Johnson Street Bridge such a bad thing, reader asks. Photo by Robert W. Harwood

Seals get the short end of the stick in Johnson St. bridge discussion

Lights may make it easy for seals to catch fry, but whales given green light to gorge on salmon

Re: Fish may hate bridge’s blue lights (News, Feb. 2)

Finally, after a lot of time and money, we now see the light at the end of the tunnel for the Johnson Street Bridge project. But we now hear from Coun. Jeremy Loveday that the lights from the new bridge may make it easier for seals to see and then gorge on young salmon.

For months on TV we have been told that ships and tankers have been asked to slow down or even change course so that whales can enjoy their feasting of salmon. The salmon do not come off too well in either scenario.

The seals, however, are really the low mammal on the totem pole, as they are being deprived of a food source. Perhaps a class action lawsuit against Loveday and the City by “Friends of Seals” might be in order. Better still, why not let old Mother Nature have her way?

Bob Beckwith

Victoria