Shootings highlight need for stricter gun control

Unthinkable tragedies are becoming an everyday occurrence in a gun-crazed culture

Two weeks after a deranged gunmen walked into a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado, killing three people and wounding nine others, his crime has almost been forgotten.

The sensational crimes of Robert Lewis Dear Jr. were drowned out by the hail of gunfire that left 14 dead in San Bernardino, Calif. The husband and wife killers responsible for that crime, who also happened to be Muslims, have been fixtures on the nightly news for the past week. But before long, they too will fade into memory.

Reports that the U.S. has logged more than 350 mass shootings this year are shocking. And, according to details shared by those who have tracked the violence, multiple mass shootings have taken place on a single day five times.

It should come as no surprise that the gun-control debate is heating up south of the border. When the issue of gun control is raised in the U.S. or here in Canada, opponents to such regulations argue the laws make no difference to those with a criminal mind and a determination to do lethal damage.

While it is true that no legislation can prevent someone from acting out on their violent intentions, we can certainly reduce the damage they can inflict by limiting the types of weapons at their disposal.

Those who hunt for food have a legitimate need to possess arms. But hunters have no need for the assault-style weapons that were used in the California shootings or the high-capacity magazines that allow shooters to fire off up to 30 rounds without reloading. Those type of weapons and ammunition were designed for a single purpose: killing human beings. And there is no legitimate reason for them to be on the streets.

Stricter gun control certainly won’t prevent every mass shooting. But if it can stop even one more of these tragedies from occurring it is worth the inconvenience to law-abiding firearm owners.

Because doing nothing can no longer be an option, without running the risk that mass shootings become so common they are no longer considered news at all.

 

Just Posted

Confusing parking lot blamed for cars tipping into flowerbeds at Peninsula Canadian Tire

Tow and repairs cost thousands, engineer says drivers’ responsibility, Canadian Tire stay quiet

Saanich says it will take months to fix a sink hole that appeared during ‘Snowmaggedon’

Roads closed in the area after the sink hole first opened in early February

Saanich councillor ‘chose pragmatism over politics’ in opposing EDPA replacement

Coun. Rebecca Mersereau acknowledged her opposition shocked many of her supporters

New secondary school planned for north Langford

Province announces $18.6 million in funding for site

PHOTOS: Car Free YYJ entertains the masses in Victoria

Third annual fair where cars are banned goes off without a hitch

WATCH: Barbers battle it out in Victoria

‘Barber Battle’ saw stylists and barbers from across North America go head-to-head

Dash-cam video in trial of accused cop killer shows man with a gun

Footage is shown at trial of Oscar Arfmann, charged with killing Const. John Davidson of Abbotsford

Suicide confirmed in case of B.C. father who’d been missing for months

2018 disappearance sparked massive search for Ben Kilmer

Eight U.S. senators write to John Horgan over B.C. mining pollution

The dispute stems from Teck Resources’ coal mines in B.C.’s Elk Valley

Threats charge against Surrey’s Jaspal Atwal stayed

Atwal, 64, was at centre of controversy in 2018 over his attendance at prime minister’s reception in India

Anti-vaxxer Robert F. Kennedy Jr. to speak in Surrey

He’s keynote speaker at Surrey Environment and Business Awards luncheon by Surrey Board of Trade Sept. 17

Otters devour 150 trout at Kootenay hatchery

The hatchery has lost close to 150 fish in the past several months

B.C. church’s Pride flag defaced for second time in 12 days

Delta’s Ladner United Church says it will continue to fly the flag for Pride month

Update: Two shot, two arrested at Toronto Raptors victory rally

The team and several dignitaries, including Justin Trudeau, remained on stage

Most Read