Taxpayers pay price for government inaction

Like an elephant with arthritis, government is too cumbersome to change course

A letter writer recently used the word “paralyzed” to describe the state of all levels of government on Victoria’s sewage issue. This is an accurate way to explain why governments fail to flex. It is the primary reason that nothing can be done to bring the facts into focus and change a parliamentary decision that is apparently written in stone – a decision on wastewater regulations that fails to account for unique, local circumstances.

Like an elephant with arthritis, government is too cumbersome to change course. It can create new laws and make new rules but it’s not very good at revisiting them.

Large organizations make the ability to back up inherently awkward. Government is no exception. Even if they want to change, they can’t. Even if every person in a position of authority knows the truth, they’re all powerless to make an executive decision. There are just too many fingers in the pie. No individual is accountable. Try (as I have) from within, to present Ottawa with legal and more practical methods. Although it might meet with individual agreement, nothing will likely be the result. The hierarchy is too convoluted to take action.

Don’t get me wrong. There are some industrious and intelligent people in government. But they are bound in a system that, by its nature, prevents plasticity. Revisiting the flaws in the laws once the ink is dry is nearly an impossible dream. Unfortunately, in the case of federal wastewater regulations, local taxpayers will pay a hefty price.

Dave Ferguson

Saanich