Indigenous

Terry Teegee, regional Chief of the B.C. Assembly of First Nations speaks at a meeting between Canada's premiers and Indigenous leaders at the Songhees Wellness Centre on July 1. (Jake Romphf/News Staff)

New First Nations centre coming to B.C. to give economic development guidance

Centre will look at how to better benefit from sectors such as forestry, mining and natural gas

Terry Teegee, regional Chief of the B.C. Assembly of First Nations speaks at a meeting between Canada's premiers and Indigenous leaders at the Songhees Wellness Centre on July 1. (Jake Romphf/News Staff)
Sheila North Wilson, right, grand chief of Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak, speaks to media as Derek Nepinak, grand chief of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs, listens in after RCMP announced at a press conference in Winnipeg, March 18, 2016. More than a year after North unsuccessfully ran to lead one of Manitoba’s largest First Nations political organizations, the Cree leader and journalist is ready to try again. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods

‘Pushed to the back’: First Nations women under-represented as chiefs in Canada

Between 15 and 18 per cent of chiefs have been women Canada-wide for the past 15 years

Sheila North Wilson, right, grand chief of Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak, speaks to media as Derek Nepinak, grand chief of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs, listens in after RCMP announced at a press conference in Winnipeg, March 18, 2016. More than a year after North unsuccessfully ran to lead one of Manitoba’s largest First Nations political organizations, the Cree leader and journalist is ready to try again. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, front right, and Squamish Nation councillor Khelsilem arrive for an announcement and groundbreaking at the First Nation’s Senakw housing development site in Vancouver on Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2022. A Vancouver residents association has launched a legal bid to quash the services agreement between the city and the Squamish Nation relating to the largest Indigenous-led housing and retail development in Canadian history. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Lawsuit targets largest Indigenous-led housing and retail development in B.C. history

Group argues services deal for Squamish Nation’s Senakw project in Vancouver unlawfully approved

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, front right, and Squamish Nation councillor Khelsilem arrive for an announcement and groundbreaking at the First Nation’s Senakw housing development site in Vancouver on Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2022. A Vancouver residents association has launched a legal bid to quash the services agreement between the city and the Squamish Nation relating to the largest Indigenous-led housing and retail development in Canadian history. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
The Parole Board of Canada has denied Tara Desousa, 40, parole once again, out of a belief that they still pose a potentially high risk to the public. This image has been cropped from the original photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lars Hagberg

Public safety over Gladue: B.C. dangerous offender denied parole after 25 years behind bars

Tara Desousa was 15 years old when they sexually assaulted an infant in Quesnel in 1997

The Parole Board of Canada has denied Tara Desousa, 40, parole once again, out of a belief that they still pose a potentially high risk to the public. This image has been cropped from the original photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lars Hagberg
A briefing document prepared for the deputy minister of Indigenous Services Canada says there is currently no way to enforce provincial or national building or fire codes for buildings on reserves. But Blaine Wiggins, senior director of the Indigenous Fire Marshals Service, seen in an undated handout photo, says that enforcement gap has “catastrophic” consequences. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Aboriginal Firefighters Association of Canada

No way to enforce fire codes on First Nations, and new law would be costly: document

House fires have long posed a major safety risk to those living on reserve,

A briefing document prepared for the deputy minister of Indigenous Services Canada says there is currently no way to enforce provincial or national building or fire codes for buildings on reserves. But Blaine Wiggins, senior director of the Indigenous Fire Marshals Service, seen in an undated handout photo, says that enforcement gap has “catastrophic” consequences. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Aboriginal Firefighters Association of Canada
Robert Riley Saunders leaving court during a cross examination in Kelowna. (Jacqueline Gelineau/Capital News)

Okanagan Nation Alliance demands inquiry into foster care after fraudulent social worker case

Saunders stole approximately $461,000 intended for 107 primarily Indigenous youth in his care

Robert Riley Saunders leaving court during a cross examination in Kelowna. (Jacqueline Gelineau/Capital News)
Natasha Harrison, second right, is comforted during a vigil for her daughter Tatyanna Harrison, 20, and for Noelle O’Soup, 13, and Chelsea Poorman, 24, in Richmond, B.C., Saturday, Sept. 3, 2022. Family members of Indigenous women killed across B.C. say there needs to be more accountability and improved communication between police jurisdictions during investigations of missing people. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Families of missing and murdered Indigenous women seek change ahead of Oct. 4 vigils

Canada-wide Sisters in Spirit vigils Oct. 4 honour missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls

Natasha Harrison, second right, is comforted during a vigil for her daughter Tatyanna Harrison, 20, and for Noelle O’Soup, 13, and Chelsea Poorman, 24, in Richmond, B.C., Saturday, Sept. 3, 2022. Family members of Indigenous women killed across B.C. say there needs to be more accountability and improved communication between police jurisdictions during investigations of missing people. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Elder Leonard Bastien, left, and Alberta Premier Jason Kenney, sign a co-stewardship agreement as they announce a new path forward regarding the stewardship of Manitou Asiniy or Manitou Stone, in Edmonton, on Friday, Sept. 30, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Creator’s Stone meteorite to be returned to its historic site after over 150 years

145-kilogram iron meteorite landed billions of years ago and has spiritual significance

Elder Leonard Bastien, left, and Alberta Premier Jason Kenney, sign a co-stewardship agreement as they announce a new path forward regarding the stewardship of Manitou Asiniy or Manitou Stone, in Edmonton, on Friday, Sept. 30, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson
People take part in ceremonies for the National Day of Truth and Reconciliation in Ottawa on Friday, Sept. 30, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Provinces, territories face calls to make Day for Truth and Reconciliation a holiday

First Nations Leadership Council deeply concerned B.C. had not made Sept. 30 a statutory holiday.

People take part in ceremonies for the National Day of Truth and Reconciliation in Ottawa on Friday, Sept. 30, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Pacific FC players will be wearing their alternate kit tonight, featuring a design by Indigenous artist Maynard Johnny Jr. The match will follow a special Orange Shirt Day Ceremony, which starts at 6:45 p.m. at Starlight Stadium. (Lia Crowe photograph)

Pacific FC hosts Orange Shirt Day ceremony ahead of tonight’s match

The team will also be wearing kit designed by Indigenous artist Maynard Johnny Jr.

Pacific FC players will be wearing their alternate kit tonight, featuring a design by Indigenous artist Maynard Johnny Jr. The match will follow a special Orange Shirt Day Ceremony, which starts at 6:45 p.m. at Starlight Stadium. (Lia Crowe photograph)
Assembly of First Nations National Chief RoseAnne Archibald addresses delegates at the conclusion of the AFN annual general meeting, in Vancouver, B.C., Thursday, July 7, 2022. The road to reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples in Canada remains a long one, says Assembly of First Nations National Chief RoseAnne Archibald, who estimates it will take 40 years at the current pace to achieve the more than 90 calls to action in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

National chief says Canada’s reconciliation actions taking long road; 40 years away

Archibald: ‘Progress toward addressing many of the calls to action remains slow’

Assembly of First Nations National Chief RoseAnne Archibald addresses delegates at the conclusion of the AFN annual general meeting, in Vancouver, B.C., Thursday, July 7, 2022. The road to reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples in Canada remains a long one, says Assembly of First Nations National Chief RoseAnne Archibald, who estimates it will take 40 years at the current pace to achieve the more than 90 calls to action in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Students from Tammi Greenwood’s Grade 5/6 class at Haahuupayak School wave to drivers from the newly painted portion of the Orange Bridge (Riverbend Bridge) over the Somass River, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2002. (PHOTO COURTESY TAMMI GREENWOOD)

Port Alberni’s iconic ‘Orange Bridge’ turns orange again for Truth and Reconciliation

Tseshaht First Nation hopes bright orange accents will change narrative of bridge

Students from Tammi Greenwood’s Grade 5/6 class at Haahuupayak School wave to drivers from the newly painted portion of the Orange Bridge (Riverbend Bridge) over the Somass River, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2002. (PHOTO COURTESY TAMMI GREENWOOD)
Students from Ruth King Elementary and Spencer Middle School gathered at Ruth King Thursday (Sept. 29) for an Orange Shirt Day ceremony as schools will be closed on Sept. 30. (Justin Samanski-Langille/News Staff)

PHOTOS: West Shore schools come together for Orange Shirt Day

Ruth King Elementary and Spencer Middle School gathered during the last day of classes for the week

Students from Ruth King Elementary and Spencer Middle School gathered at Ruth King Thursday (Sept. 29) for an Orange Shirt Day ceremony as schools will be closed on Sept. 30. (Justin Samanski-Langille/News Staff)
Maxwell Johnson (left) and members of the Heiltsuk Nation gathered outside the BMO on Burrard Street in Vancouver May 5 to announce a settlement has been reached after Johnson and his granddaughter were handcuffed outside the branch two years ago. (Jane Skrypnek/Black Press Media)

Heiltsuk man, granddaughter handcuffed outside Vancouver BMO reach settlement with police

VPD promises overhaul of police training, addressing of anti-Indigenous racism

Maxwell Johnson (left) and members of the Heiltsuk Nation gathered outside the BMO on Burrard Street in Vancouver May 5 to announce a settlement has been reached after Johnson and his granddaughter were handcuffed outside the branch two years ago. (Jane Skrypnek/Black Press Media)
Isaiah Harris, at Ladysmith Secondary School on Saturday, May 28, for a showing of the film Tzouhalem — which he narrated —presented by the school’s land and language program. (Duck Paterson photo)

Vancouver Island youth living his storytelling dreams through Indigenous films

Emerging talent wants to share Indigenous stories in a responsible and respectful way

Isaiah Harris, at Ladysmith Secondary School on Saturday, May 28, for a showing of the film Tzouhalem — which he narrated —presented by the school’s land and language program. (Duck Paterson photo)
Indigenous artist John Marston in his Chemainus studio.The painting behind him is by his friend, Ladysmith artist Dennis Brown. In front of him are architectural plans for new artist studios in Ladysmith that he is helping to design. Don Denton photo.

Rising from the storm

Stz’uminus artist John Marston

  • Sep 28, 2022
Indigenous artist John Marston in his Chemainus studio.The painting behind him is by his friend, Ladysmith artist Dennis Brown. In front of him are architectural plans for new artist studios in Ladysmith that he is helping to design. Don Denton photo.
People take part in a march to mark the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation in Montreal, Thursday, Sept. 30, 2021. While Canada prepares to honour the second annual National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, the majority of provinces and territories have not followed the federal government’s decision to make it an official statutory holiday for its workers. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

‘We shouldn’t have to push people’: Most provinces have not made Sept. 30 a stat

New Brunswick has joined PEI as the latest to declare Sept. 30 a provincial holiday

People take part in a march to mark the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation in Montreal, Thursday, Sept. 30, 2021. While Canada prepares to honour the second annual National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, the majority of provinces and territories have not followed the federal government’s decision to make it an official statutory holiday for its workers. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
Nuchatlaht and Nuu-chah-nulth First Nation leaders and supporters rally at the BC Supreme Court in Vancouver on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2022, ahead of closing arguments in an Indigenous title case between the Nuchatlaht First Nation and the B.C. government. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Brieanna Charlebois

Lawyer for First Nation says goal of B.C. land claim case is reconciliation

Nuchatlaht First Nation claims government “effectively dispossessed” it of Vancouver Island territory

Nuchatlaht and Nuu-chah-nulth First Nation leaders and supporters rally at the BC Supreme Court in Vancouver on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2022, ahead of closing arguments in an Indigenous title case between the Nuchatlaht First Nation and the B.C. government. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Brieanna Charlebois
Gloria Morgan (Jacqueline Gelineau/Capital News)

‘So much work to do’ to continue healing for North Okanagan residential school survivor

Each August, Indigenous children were rounded up and taken back to residential school

Gloria Morgan (Jacqueline Gelineau/Capital News)
Hundreds of Chilliwack secondary students and teachers took part in their school’s Reconciliation Walk in 2019. (Jenna Hauck/ The Progress)

Truth and Reconciliation Day: Education should be the priority, says B.C. Indigenous leader

Between 1831 and 1998, more than 150,000 children were thrust into Indian Residential Schools

Hundreds of Chilliwack secondary students and teachers took part in their school’s Reconciliation Walk in 2019. (Jenna Hauck/ The Progress)
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