Science

Physical forces conspire against Dustin Haracka and his ‘Batmobile’ as he tries to navigate a downhill slalom course during the first Vancouver Island University Engineering Soapbox Race on Thursday, April 7. (Chris Bush/News Bulletin)

Nanaimo engineering students come to grips with gravity at soapbox derby

VIU Engineering Club holds race day, hopes to make it an annual event

Physical forces conspire against Dustin Haracka and his ‘Batmobile’ as he tries to navigate a downhill slalom course during the first Vancouver Island University Engineering Soapbox Race on Thursday, April 7. (Chris Bush/News Bulletin)
An Asian giant hornet from Japan is held on a pin by Sven Spichiger, an entomologist with the Washington state Dept. of Agriculture in Olympia, Wash. in May 2020. University of California researchers are now looking into using sex pheromones to trap male Asian giant hornets and reduce mating. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)

Sex traps could muzzle mating of Asian giant ‘murder hornets,’ slow spread to B.C.

Researchers experimenting with ensnaring male hornets with sex pheromones

An Asian giant hornet from Japan is held on a pin by Sven Spichiger, an entomologist with the Washington state Dept. of Agriculture in Olympia, Wash. in May 2020. University of California researchers are now looking into using sex pheromones to trap male Asian giant hornets and reduce mating. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
The mother tree experiment involves monitoring regrowth after selective harvesting in B.C. forests. (Submitted photo)

Experts are looking into how mother trees can help reduce risk of wildfires in northern B.C.

Network of ‘mother trees’ keeps forests healthy, says UBC researcher

The mother tree experiment involves monitoring regrowth after selective harvesting in B.C. forests. (Submitted photo)
When he established his lab at the University of British Columbia in the 1980s, Vancouver biochemistry professor Pieter Cullis, as shown in this handout image, says he never could have fathomed that his “curiosity-based” research would eventually play a critical role in the development of vaccines that have benefitted hundreds of millions of people across the globe. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-COURTESY OF MANUFACTURER-Paul Joseph

UBC biochemist wins Gairdner Award for role in COVID-19 vaccines

Pieter Cullis and his ‘curiosity-based’ research honoured for pioneering work

When he established his lab at the University of British Columbia in the 1980s, Vancouver biochemistry professor Pieter Cullis, as shown in this handout image, says he never could have fathomed that his “curiosity-based” research would eventually play a critical role in the development of vaccines that have benefitted hundreds of millions of people across the globe. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-COURTESY OF MANUFACTURER-Paul Joseph
A participant at a rally for old-growth forest conservation outside the B.C. legislature on Feb. 14.(Jake Romphf/News Staff)

90 scientists ask feds to protect carbon-rich old forests in upcoming climate plan

Canada is home to about 16 per cent of the world’s remaining old-growth forests

A participant at a rally for old-growth forest conservation outside the B.C. legislature on Feb. 14.(Jake Romphf/News Staff)
Niobe Thompson, left, is the co-director of Carbon – The Unauthorised Biography. (Photo courtesy of Carbon - The Unauthorised Biography)

Victoria filmmaker’s new doc explores the ‘wonderful and horrible irony’ of carbon

Carbon transitions from foundational element for life to one everyone loves to hate

Niobe Thompson, left, is the co-director of Carbon – The Unauthorised Biography. (Photo courtesy of Carbon - The Unauthorised Biography)
Amateur astronomer Jaskarn “Sid” Sidhu has his own observatory set up at his house in Highlands. (Bailey Moreton/News Staff)

Humble West Shore amateur astronomer not one to bask in glow of asteroid naming

Jaskarn Singh ‘Sid’ Sidhu a dedicated volunteer with Victoria branch of astronomical society

Amateur astronomer Jaskarn “Sid” Sidhu has his own observatory set up at his house in Highlands. (Bailey Moreton/News Staff)
According to FishSounds.net, fish enjoy lively conversations over the coral reefs. (Photo by Kieran Cox)

University of Victoria researcher helps build global inventory of fish grunts, squeals

Research helps better understand how noise impacts marine life

According to FishSounds.net, fish enjoy lively conversations over the coral reefs. (Photo by Kieran Cox)
RCMP underwater recovery team members Cpl. Todd Kaufmann, left, Cpl. Steve Wells and Const. Tim Cucheran worked with ‘Fab’, a Seamor Marine Chinook ROV to recover a bulldozer operator’s body in Nunavut in February. (Photo submitted)

B.C. tech recovers body after bulldozer breaks through Arctic ice and sinks

Seamor Marine remotely operated vehicle used in deepest recovery operation in RCMP history

RCMP underwater recovery team members Cpl. Todd Kaufmann, left, Cpl. Steve Wells and Const. Tim Cucheran worked with ‘Fab’, a Seamor Marine Chinook ROV to recover a bulldozer operator’s body in Nunavut in February. (Photo submitted)
Christoph Deeg, Pacific Salmon Foundation researcher. Photo by Alanna D Photography.

New Pacific Salmon Foundation research sheds new light on open ocean survival

Study examines relationship between environmental conditions, pathogens, and gene expression

Christoph Deeg, Pacific Salmon Foundation researcher. Photo by Alanna D Photography.
This is a scanning electron microscope photo of some of the sediment from deep in the core from Topknot Lake (ca. 16,500 years ago), showing the remains of several species of diatoms, the identification of which indicates whether the water in the lake was fresh or marine at that time. In Topknot Lake there is no sign of marine diatoms, implying that relative sea level never rose to the height of the lake (13 metres above modern sea level). Photo: T. Holmes, NRCAN

Parts of Northern Vancouver Island missed by last Ice Age — researchers

Lake on west side of Island not covered by ice, prompting questions about early human habitation

This is a scanning electron microscope photo of some of the sediment from deep in the core from Topknot Lake (ca. 16,500 years ago), showing the remains of several species of diatoms, the identification of which indicates whether the water in the lake was fresh or marine at that time. In Topknot Lake there is no sign of marine diatoms, implying that relative sea level never rose to the height of the lake (13 metres above modern sea level). Photo: T. Holmes, NRCAN
Diplodocids, a type of long-necked sauropod, are seen in a hypothetical artist’s rendering of what they looked like during their lives. Cary Woodruff, a recent PhD graduate from the University of Toronto, and a team of researchers studied a fossil that may provide evidence of the first known case of a bird-style lung disease in a dinosaur. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-University of Western Ontario

Researchers find evidence of first dinosaur with sore throat, flu symptoms

Canadian scientists say long-necked sauropod was feeling crummy from respiratory infection

Diplodocids, a type of long-necked sauropod, are seen in a hypothetical artist’s rendering of what they looked like during their lives. Cary Woodruff, a recent PhD graduate from the University of Toronto, and a team of researchers studied a fossil that may provide evidence of the first known case of a bird-style lung disease in a dinosaur. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-University of Western Ontario
A MarineLabs Data Systems sensor buoy recorded a 17.6 metre rogue wave off Ucluelet’s coast in 2020 that the company believes is the most extreme rogue wave ever recorded. (MarineLabs Data Systems)

‘Most extreme’ rogue wave ever recorded off B.C. reignites alternative energy interest

17.6-metre crest observed offshore from Ucluelet called a once in ‘1,300 years’ phenomenon

A MarineLabs Data Systems sensor buoy recorded a 17.6 metre rogue wave off Ucluelet’s coast in 2020 that the company believes is the most extreme rogue wave ever recorded. (MarineLabs Data Systems)
Senior biologist Allan Jan holds Methuselah, a 4-foot-long, 40-pound Australian lungfish that was brought to the California Academy of Sciences in 1938 from Australia, in its tank in San Francisco, Monday, Jan. 24, 2022. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

Meet Methuselah, the oldest living aquarium fish

1.2-metre Australian lungfish was brought to the San Francisco museum in 1938 from Australia.

Senior biologist Allan Jan holds Methuselah, a 4-foot-long, 40-pound Australian lungfish that was brought to the California Academy of Sciences in 1938 from Australia, in its tank in San Francisco, Monday, Jan. 24, 2022. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
A rockfish. Courtesy Central Coast Indigenous Resource Alliance.

Researchers uncover and map biological hotspots of B.C.’s Central Coast

Rich groups of rockfish, sponges and corals found, including in fjords and inland channels

A rockfish. Courtesy Central Coast Indigenous Resource Alliance.
Mark Pathy is seen in his office with a model of the SpaceX starship in Montreal on Monday, November 8, 2021. Pathy is slated to embark in February on a 10-day journey on the maiden voyage of Texas-based Axiom Space paying about 50 million dollars US for the privilege. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Private Canadian astronaut gears up for ‘pain’ experiments in space

Mark Pathy has boarded more than his share of vehicles. He rode…

Mark Pathy is seen in his office with a model of the SpaceX starship in Montreal on Monday, November 8, 2021. Pathy is slated to embark in February on a 10-day journey on the maiden voyage of Texas-based Axiom Space paying about 50 million dollars US for the privilege. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson
Benjamin Tutolo of the Solid Carbon team measures the pH of water in his laboratory at the University of Calgary. Solid Carbon is led by Ocean Networks Canada, an initiative of UVic. (Photo courtesy of Qin Zhang)

UVic, U-Calgary researchers investigate possibility of CO2 storage in ocean basalt

Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions says innovation may help reduce greenhouse gas emissions

Benjamin Tutolo of the Solid Carbon team measures the pH of water in his laboratory at the University of Calgary. Solid Carbon is led by Ocean Networks Canada, an initiative of UVic. (Photo courtesy of Qin Zhang)
Mayor Fred Haynes meets with several members of the Vancouver Island Life Sciences group. Haynes hopes to ensure innovation in science continues in the district and beyond. (Photo courtesy of Fred Haynes)
Mayor Fred Haynes meets with several members of the Vancouver Island Life Sciences group. Haynes hopes to ensure innovation in science continues in the district and beyond. (Photo courtesy of Fred Haynes)
Shreya Sivakumar is approaching her Grade 12 year at Mount Douglas Secondary and just finished up a summer internship program at the University of Alberta that was tailored to her interests as she gears up for university. (Megan Atkins-Baker/News Staff)

Inclusive research program hosts Saanich Grade 12 student in paid online internship

Shreya Sivakumar participates in summer internship at University of Alberta

Shreya Sivakumar is approaching her Grade 12 year at Mount Douglas Secondary and just finished up a summer internship program at the University of Alberta that was tailored to her interests as she gears up for university. (Megan Atkins-Baker/News Staff)
Matthew Purse (left), Deng Jiang, Derek Scheltens, and Mingrui Qin designed and built a VR hang gliding simulator. (Megan Atkins-Baker/News Staff)

Engineering students showcase 8 innovative capstone projects at Saanich campus

Eight innovative capstone projects were showcased in total at the Aug. 20 event

Matthew Purse (left), Deng Jiang, Derek Scheltens, and Mingrui Qin designed and built a VR hang gliding simulator. (Megan Atkins-Baker/News Staff)
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