Students unite in annual fight against cancer

Reynolds students, cancer survivors, continue legacy of Tour de Rock fundraising

Bottom middle clockwise- Reynolds students fifteen-year-old Cassidy Stadel

Charlie Muth has lost her hair twice and this fall the 14-year-old will lose it once more – but this time for a different reason.

When Muth was in kindergarten, she was diagnosed with lymphoblastic lymphoma, a cancer of the lymph nodes that left the child enduring surgery and years of chemotherapy treatments. Like many childhood cancer patients forced to spend more time in a hospital room than a playground, Muth began making summer visits to Camp Goodtimes, a camp for kids with cancer.

Nearly 10 years later and cancer-free, Muth continues to return to Goodtimes, where she has a familial bond with the campers.

“You look around and see all the little kids who are bald and they just have the biggest smiles on their faces,” she said of the camp which is supported by the Canadian Cancer Society Cops for Cancer Tour de Rock and free for children with cancer to attend.

This summer before entering Grade 10 at Reynolds secondary, Muth was seriously considering joining the group of students and staff at the school who each year shave their heads to raise cash for pediatric cancer research and the camp through Cops for Cancer. Then, in a moment at the camp dance, she made up her mind.

“There was a little bald boy in the corner sitting alone, so me and my friends went and danced with him and the smile it brought to his face – I was sure I was going to shave it then. Seeing a little kid bald and shy really touched me.”

In less than a week, Muth had collected nearly $1,000 in donations for the Canadian Cancer Society and on Thursday, she will be one of more than 100 students and staff at the school to say goodbye to the hair on their head.

“For many of the girls, it’s emotional and powerful and there are tears,” said Reynolds teacher Dean Norris-Jones. “But it’s a healthy risk. If you’re a teenaged girl (with a shaved head) you’re not the only one in the building. There are dozens of teenaged girls who shave their heads because they understand the metaphor.”

Norris-Jones, a cancer survivor himself, was the first to suggest to principal Alana Charlton that the school join the fundraising campaign.

“Every year we get stronger and it seems to become more integral to the identity of the school,” he said.

Reynolds has participated in the event for eight years, with the dollar amount on the cheque the school hands over to the Canadian Cancer Society rising each year, from $16,000 in the first year to $84,000 in 2011. The bulk of the funds are a result of pledges for head shaving, but every year the almost entirely student-led initiative includes an array of bake sales, car washes and bottle drives.

“As if by magic, all kinds of spontaneous student fundraisers start happening,” Norris-Jones said of the intense two-week campaign. “Students at Reynolds recognize that they have a moral mandate to make the world a better place and the concept of service is a part of being a Reynolds citizen.”

Some of those citizens were unaware of Muth’s past and since hearing her story have been swept into the culture. Seven of her friends have stepped up to the plate to shave their heads along side the teen.

“A lot of them didn’t know that I had cancer, so for them to see a perfectly healthy kid in the hallways, then to know that I’ve battled one of the worst diseases, knowing that I’ve been through so much and I’m so tough – they realized how inspiring it was to have gone through that and to be so strong now.”

Don’t forget to enter the draw for a $500 Thrifty Foods gift card on the home page of the Black Press Tour de Rock site, bclocalnews.com/tour-de-rock.

nnorth@saanichnews.com

Join the 17-member Tour de Rock team of police officers and special guests, including the News’ own reporter Kyle Slavin, in the final leg of their 1,000 fundraising bike ride down the Island when they arrive in Victoria. (School events open to students and their families only; other events are public.)

Thursday, Oct. 4

Oak Bay High, team arrives at 9:45 a.m.

Lambrick Park secondary 10:30 a.m.

Pacific Institute of Sport Excellence 11:20 a.m.

Royal Oak Middle school 12:00 p.m.

Claremont 12:30 p.m.

Friday, Oct. 5

Esquimalt High 9 a.m.

Esquimalt Plaza, community event runs from 9 – 11 a.m., with the Team’s arrival slated for 9:20 a.m.

Coast Capital Savings, Tillicum Centre 10 a.m.

Spectrum Community school 10:20 a.m

Glanford middle school 11 a.m.

St. Margaret’s 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Lochside elementary 12:40 p.m.

Reynolds secondary 12:55 p.m.

Mount Doug secondary 1:30 p.m.

Dawson Heights (seniors’ housing, 3710 Cedar Hill Rd.) 2 p.m.

Finale in Centennial Square 4 – 7 p.m.

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

New exhibit at Point Ellice House examines history of waste, water and privilege

Night soil scavengers in the 19th century would collect human waste and dump it around the city

Salish Sea scavenger hunt turns participants into citizen scientists

Public invited to join the Great Salish Sea BioBlitz

Coastal scenes at the forefront for July shows at Victoria galleries

From sculpture to landscape paintings, summer art is about nature

Rapid bus system could increase frequency, reliability in Greater Victoria

BC Transit studies methods for improving major routes in Capital Region

It’s showtime: Victoria theatre reopens with new COVID-19 protocols

Capitol 6 theatre and SilverCity Victoria have reopened with limited seating

PHOTOS: B.C.’s top doc picks up personalized Fluevog shoes, tours mural exhibition

Murals of Gratitude exhibit includes at least one portrait of Henry alongside paintings of health-care workers

In troubled times: Independence Day in a land of confusion

Buffeted by invisible forces and just plain worn out, the United States of America celebrates its 244th birthday

Stop enforcing sex work laws during COVID-19, advocates say

There are provisions in Canada’s prostitution laws that make workers immune from prosecution, but not from arrest

Liberal party finished 2019 having spent $43 million, raised $42 million

All political parties had until midnight June 30 to submit their financial reports for last year

B.C. teacher loses licence after sexual relationships with two recently-graduated students

The teacher won’t be allowed to apply for a teaching certificate until 2035

White-throated sparrows have changed their tune, B.C. study unveils

Study marks an unprecedented development scientists say has caused them to sit up and take note

Two injured hikers airlifted from North Vancouver Island Park

Campbell River and Comox Search and Rescue hoist team rescued the injured from Cape Scott Provincial Park

Alberta health minister orders review into response after noose found in hospital in 2016

A piece of rope tied into a noose was found taped to the door of an operating room at the Grande Prairie Hospital in 2016

Most Read