Canadians turned to Google in good times and bad in 2018. (Katya Slepian/Black Press Media)

Humboldt Broncos, cannabis, Fortnite: Here are Canadians’ top Google searches for 2018

When celebrities died or Canada Post went on strike, Canada turned to Google

Why is Canada Post on strike?

Why do dogs eat poop?

How old is Prince Harry?

Those were just some of the top Google searches made by Canadians in 2018.

The tech giant revealed the list of its top searches Wednesday and the results, well, they shouldn’t be surprising.

Following the horrific Saskatchewan hockey bus crash that left 16 dead and almost as many injured, Canadians took to Google to ask about the Humboldt Broncos.

READ MORE: Humboldt Broncos emerge from tragedy

Other major headlines, like the Canada Post strike, cannabis and the Ontario election also made Canadians’ top news searches.

READ MORE: Puff, puff, pass: Cannabis is officially legal across Canada

READ MORE: Canada Post backlog, Greyhound exit creating headaches ahead of the holidays

As far as hockey teams go, we’re not picking favourites but Canadians certainly did: the Winnipeg Jets were the only hockey team to make the list.

Over on the tech side, games made up the majority of the top five searches with Fortnite, Fallout 76 and Red Dead Redemption 2 all making the cut.

Other tech searches included bitcoin and the iPhoneXS.

READ MORE: B.C. Fortnite gamer donates $164,000 in winnings to SPCA

READ MORE: Got $1,100? Apple shows off its most expensive iPhone yet

Demi Lovato topped searches in both the people and the musicians and bands categories while 6ix9ine, a U.S. rapper actually named Daniel Hernandez, rounded out the top five.

He also made an appearance in the questions category with”Why is 6ix9ine going to jail?”

The answer to that question is also on Google: He faces a possible life sentence in federal prison on gang-related racketeering, firearms and drug charges.

When the world lost its stars, Canadians turned to Google.

The searched for famous chef Anthony Bourdain, fashion icon Kate Spade, musicians Mac Miller and Avicci and famed physicist Stephen Hawking.

READ MORE: Celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain found dead at 61


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Delays expected on Interurban Road due to wastewater treatment project in Saanich

Traffic down to a single alternating lane until Sunday evening

Sidney handles plastic bags with wait-and-see approach

Officials say they will wait for courts and provincial action concerning single-use plastic bags

West Shore RCMP bust seizes $50,000 worth of drugs

More than 300 grams of cocaine and crack-cocaine seized in Victoria

Downtown Victoria tea shop switches to plastic tea bags

Murchie’s Tea and Coffee says the transition is temporary

WATCH: Greater Victoria’s top stories of the day

A round-up of the day’s top stories

POLL: Do you think the day of the federal election should be a statutory holiday?

Increasing voter turnout has long been a goal of officials across the… Continue reading

Alberta truck convoy plans counter-protest at climate rally with Greta Thunberg

United We Roll organizer says similar protest planned for Swedish teen’s event in Edmonton

Scheer, Trudeau, Singh haggle over potential minority government outcome

If you believe the polls, it appears the Liberals and Conservatives are neck-and-neck

British family deported after ‘accidental’ U.S. border crossing

U.S. officials deny it was mistake, release video of vehicle crossing into Washington from Langley

LETTERS: Wolf kills, wilderness protection and caribou recovery

Readers respond to Tom Fletcher’s column on B.C. program

Kamloops man hangs on to back of stolen truck as suspect speeds away, crashes

The pickup truck was seen leaving the roadway before bursting into flames

‘Sky didn’t fall:’ Police, lawyers still adjusting after pot legalization

Statistics Canada says 541 people were charged under the federal Cannabis Act between Oct. 17, 2018 and the end of the year

Fewer people prescribed opioids in B.C., but other provinces lack data: doctors

Patients who began taking opioids were prescribed smaller doses for shorter duration

Most Read