VIDEO: B.C. radio telescope records low-frequency burst from outer space

VIDEO: B.C. radio telescope records low-frequency burst from outer space

Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment picked up fast radio burst of record-low frequency

A Canadian radio telescope in B.C. has picked up a ‘deep’ signal from outer space that marks the first of its kind ever to be recorded.

The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, also known as CHIME, said it picked up a low-frequency fast radio burst on July 25.

Fast radio bursts (FRB) are intense bursts of radio emissions that last mere milliseconds. While rare, the exact origin of these bursts remain unknown.

The group, which spends most of its time listening for signals from outer space, said the fast radio burst was “special” because it had a frequency of 580 Mhz – while no other burst of its kind had been detected below 700 Mhz before. The FRB has been given the name FRB 180725A.

A graphic depicting the low frequency wavelength heard by CHIME researchers. (CHIME/FRB Collaboration)

“The automated pipeline triggered the recording to disk of ~20 seconds of buffered raw intensity data around the time of the FRB,” CHIME’s Patrick Boyle said in a post on an astronomer telegram forum.

Aside from being able to document FRB’s, scientists and researchers have very little information about them since being first discovered in 2007.

Some people speculate that they come from black holes, some say alien civilizations and others attribute an exploding star.

With files from The Canadian Press


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

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