Belmont Secondary School pitching in to keep grounds natural in Langford

Belmont Secondary School students Ian Herrington and Bernardo de Lima Oberg clear invasive species and plant trees on Earth Day (April 22). (Courtesy Dayna Christ-Rowling)Belmont Secondary School students Ian Herrington and Bernardo de Lima Oberg clear invasive species and plant trees on Earth Day (April 22). (Courtesy Dayna Christ-Rowling)
Belmont Secondary School students Keanah Sansome, Danu Porter, and Cole Chamberlain plant trees near the school on Earth Day (April 22). (Courtesy Dayna Christ-Rowling)Belmont Secondary School students Keanah Sansome, Danu Porter, and Cole Chamberlain plant trees near the school on Earth Day (April 22). (Courtesy Dayna Christ-Rowling)
Belmont Secondary School students Ben Farkas and Matthew Boudreau plant trees near the school on Earth Day. (Courtesy Dayna Christ-Rowling)Belmont Secondary School students Ben Farkas and Matthew Boudreau plant trees near the school on Earth Day. (Courtesy Dayna Christ-Rowling)
Belmont Secondary School students Sophia Herrington and Megan Campbell plant trees near the school on Earth Day. (Courtesy Dayna Christ-Rowling)Belmont Secondary School students Sophia Herrington and Megan Campbell plant trees near the school on Earth Day. (Courtesy Dayna Christ-Rowling)

Students and staff from Belmont Secondary School in Langford spent their Earth Day (April 22) helping to return part of the school property to its natural beauty.

Students from the school’s outdoor education, environmental science, and social justice classes spent the day removing invasive species and planting native trees donated by the City of Langford.

“The challenge for us was to get rid of the broom that had taken over the area and to bring back the forest, so that’s what we have been working on,” said teacher Dayna Christ-Rowling. “It’s getting better and better all the time.”

Approximately 1,000 seedlings were planted on Earth Day but efforts to remove the invasive plants have been ongoing since 2015. Given how persistent and quick-growing Scotch broom is, Christ-Rowling said removing it and maintaining the grounds will be an ongoing effort.

In addition to the trees, native grass, ferns, and other plants are being planted on the hillside next to the school.

READ MORE: Colwood couple recognized for park cleanup efforts on Earth Day


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