Photojournalist Ami Vitale will share her stories of working in war zones and taking an interest in endangered species such as the white rhino, when she appears as part of National Geographic’s live speaker series Jan. 24 at the Royal Theatre. Ami Vitale photo

National Geographic live returns to Victoria

World-renowned adventurers tell tales on the Royal Theatre stage

For over 100 years, the pages of National Geographic have brought to life scenes from across the globe.

Now, for the first time ever on the West Coast, the magazine’s live speaker series will bring those photos to a Victoria audience on a much larger scale, complete with the photographer in tow.

The three-part series kicked off in November with underwater photographer Brian Skerry, prompted by the Royal Theatre’s new projection screen that gives the audience a perspective from a whole new lens.

“You get this feeling of really being right there,” says Randy Joynt, manager of external affairs for the Royal and McPherson Theatre Society.

“For many people who have grown up with National Geographic, the brand itself really speaks to them,” he explains. “As you get beyond the pages, [this event] enables you to interact with these explorer and adventurer personalities.”

Award-winning photojournalist Ami Vitale took an interest in endangered species while working in war zones. She’ll present a snapshot of her career, alongside stories of the giant panda and the last three living Northern White rhinos, when part two of the series, Rhinos, Rickshaws and Revolutions takes the stage at the Royal on Jan. 24.

Each series culminates in a question-and-answer period for the audience, who Joynt says the RMTS thought would be a natural fit for the talks.

“We saw a gap in the market and thought this would really resonate with Victorians – environmentally sensitive folks who are curious and interested in the world.”

The theatre also hopes to engage students, with a special morning performance and student-priced tickets for schools who wish to make a field trip out of the experience. The show is slightly shorter and geared toward a student level, but also includes a Q&A period.

“The students were fantastic in terms of their knowledge and their interest,” Joynt says of those who attended the first talk.

Part three of the speaker series welcomes paleontologist Nizar Ibrahim to the Royal on May 2 for Spinosaurus: Lost Giant of the Cretaceous. Ibrahim was part of a team that uncovered a fossil of a spinosaurus – the largest predatory dinosaur ever discovered – for a second time in Egypt. But you’ll have to attend the talk to hear the first part of the story.

For more details on Nat Geo Live visit RMTS.bc.ca or for tickets call 250-386-6121, shop online or in person at the McPherson or Royal box offices.

kristyn.anthony@vicnews.com

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