Education Minister Mike Bernier (left) negotiated a deal with B.C. Teachers' Federation president Jim Iker to provide extra professional development time on the new public school curriculum.

Curriculum training cuts into teaching time

School districts have to find two days of non-teaching time this year, on top of professional development days

B.C. teachers switching to the education ministry’s new curriculum this year will use 10 hours of classroom time to train on it.

Education Minister Mike Bernier announced the training plan Monday at the B.C. legislature, with teacher, trustee and parent representatives alongside. Bernier said training the first 2,000 teachers to deliver the new curriculum this year will cost $1 million and take the equivalent of two teaching days.

It’s up to local school districts to decide how that time is organized, but it may mean extra non-instructional days or parts of days when students would be sent home early.

The new curriculum is being piloted this year for kindergarten through Grade 9 and will become mandatory across the province starting next fall. Curriculum updates for the higher grades are still in development.

For the next two years, teachers across B.C. will use one of their current professional development days for curriculum training and an additional five hours, the equivalent of one classroom day, will also be devoted to the new curriculum.

Bernier confirmed that the program is being implemented within existing budgets. The additional $1 million this year is to fund teacher training seminars and travel costs for rural teachers where the training isn’t offered in their home districts.

The training plan was announced with representatives of the B.C. Teachers’ Federation, the B.C. School Trustees’ Association, superintendents, principals and vice principals, parent advisory councils, independent schools, and the First Nations Steering Committee.

BCSTA president Teresa Rezansoff said school boards will decide how to structure the training to “best meet the needs of teachers while minimizing any impact on student learning time.”

Bernier says the new curriculum emphasizes “hands on” learning and more flexibility for individualized studies. Two areas of emphasis are environmental education and an enhanced aboriginal perspective in every subject.

 

Just Posted

Saanich residents deliver notice to Capital Regional District

Grange Road residents fear the loss of up to 50 trees

Council approves plan banning cycling in Haro Woods

Municipality accused of caving to small minority of park users

‘Fix Canada First’ posters found at Victoria bus stops

At least five posters found along Douglas Street

Victoria Police investigate stabbing in restaurant on Douglas Street

Police were called to the 800-block around 1:30 p.m.

Oak Bay teen targets 1,000 toys

Toy drive for Stan Hagen Centre For Families is Dec. 15 and 16 on Oak Bay Avenue

WATCH: Hundreds of gifts go out to Victoria’s Our Place patrons

The Angel Gifts Program saw 700 Christmas presents go out to the community

POLL: Are you dreaming of a white Christmas?

The rain Vancouver Island is famous for is coming down in buckets,… Continue reading

Vancouver Island man named Philadelphia Flyers assistant GM

Courtenay’s Brent Flahr spent nine-plus years in Minnesota

Warning issued as forecast calls for 20-foot waves in Tofino

Dangerous waves, strong currents and upper-shoreline flooding expected for Tofino-Ucluelet area

Oil tanker ban to be reviewed by committee

Indigenous groups for and against Bill C-48 travel to Ottawa to influence the Senate’s decision

An 800-pound pig named Theodore needs a forever home, B.C. society says

‘Theodore is not destined to be somebody’s bacon’

Teenager Alphonso Davies wins Canadian Men’s Soccer Player for the Year Award

Derek Cornelius and Chilliwack native, Jordyn Huitema were named Canadian Youth International Players of the Year

B.C. teen MMA fighter shows heart

Young Unity MMA competitors bring home Ws

Most Read