Saanich will take another look at Glendenning parking

Parking ban has been a bone of contention with many frequent visitors to Mount Douglas Park

David Poje is one of those hoping to find a solution to the parking problem at the Glendenning Road entrance to Mount Douglas Park.

Council has agreed with a group of citizens that Saanich’s parking ban implemented on Glendenning Road near the entrance to Mount Douglas Park is worth revisiting.

The no parking signs showed up around June but have largely been ignored, igniting discussion over the use of Glendenning Road. To date, a small lot for about five cars remains on the north end of Glendenning. But that’s not nearly enough, says a band of regular walkers who prefer the entrance to Mount Doug for its access to flat trails. Some with disabilities call the spot their preferred access to the park.

They are hoping for some additional parking, while multiple residents of Glendenning stepped up in support of the parking ban.

David Poje has championed the issue for two months now and brought the matter to council during a delegation meeting on Oct. 26.

“I only wanted to bring it to council and here it is, so my objectives are complete,” Poje said. “I’ve sent far more emails than you’d ever want.”

Poje was one of about 24 people to speak and spent his five minutes of time thanking local supporters and council.

“Now I can sit back and leave it in the capable hands of council,” Poje said.

The street, which was the 1880s-era boundary of Adam Glendenning’s farm, acts as a border between the Blenkinsop Valley and Gordon Head community associations, and is a well-used cycling greenway that connects the San Juan and Blenkinsop greenways.

A proposal drafted by Poje, but not endorsed by Saanich, drew several residents to the microphone, worried the road would be widened or trees cut down.

“Isn’t this an amazing issue to have, here in this municipality our problem is a popular park,” said Blenkinsop Valley resident Illarion Gallant. “As a previous speaker said, if you increase the parking, how many more will come.”

Another issue that comes up often is the spillover the parking ban has created. Nearby Winchester Road is filling up with cars as it connects to the Glendenning-Mount Doug entrance by a Saanich-maintained  pedestrian path that doubles as an emergency fire lane.

A Winchester homeowner who wished not to be named said the number of cars on her road has increased so much that she backs into her driveway so she can see who’s zipping out of the Winchester exit.

“It’s an accident waiting to happen.”

Council motioned for a staff report that will provide recommendations on the Glendenning parking ban and for all the Mount Doug access points.

 

Coun. Fred Haynes chaired the Glendenning portion of the council meeting and said it was “a marvellous example of how people can come together and share ideas, a celebration of democracy.”

 

 

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