Tsunami motorcycle heading to Milwaukee

The bike washed ashore on a beach in Haida Gwaii at the end of April after being swept out to sea in the tsunami that hit Japan in 2011.



All parties have been contacted and a decision has been made to leave the tsunami Harley-Davidson in its current condition.

The corroded, sand-filled motorcycle will be displayed in the Harley-Davidson Museum in Milwaukee, Wisconsin as a testament to its incredible journey and the tragic story behind it.

The bike washed ashore on a beach in Haida Gwaii at the end of April after being swept out to sea in the tsunami that hit Japan in 2011. It travelled across the ocean in a container box. Upon hearing of the story of the bike, Langford businessman Steve Drane had the idea to restore the motorcycle and return it to its owner in Japan. Plans changed, however, as the story attracted worldwide media attention.

The bike is now in Vancouver under the care of Deeley Harley-Davidson Canada. It will make its journey to Milwaukee, the home of Harley-Davidson headquarters.

The decision was made with input from the Canadian, U.S. and Japanese divisions of Harley-Davidson, who worked with the Japanese owner of the motorcycle, Ikuo Yokoyama, to come up with a solution.

Yokoyama, while touched that Drane and others were willing to fix his bike and return it to him, decided that he would rather see it “preserved in its current condition and exhibited to the many visitors .. as a memorial to a tragedy that claimed thousands of lives,” he said in a press release.

In the tsunami, Yokohama lost three family members and his home. The 29-year-old is still living in temporary housing in Miyagi Prefecture.

“I am very grateful to the Harley-Davidson Museum for offering me an opportunity to visit the museum, and I would like to do that when things have calmed down,” Yokohama said.

While on display at Drane’s Langford store, the motorcycle drew hundreds of people. Some were quite taken by the sight of the bike, Drane said, and would spend a few moments in silence taking in the story it tells.

“You couldn’t tell a story this good if the bike was restored,” Drane said. “It just mystified people.”

news@goldstreamgazette.com

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Conflict expert explains how to talk to people who aren’t social distancing

Approach the conversation with empathy says conflict expert

Saanich moves forward with summer camp registration despite COVID-19

District to give full refunds if camps are cancelled

COVID-19: Managing your mental health from isolation

Ministry of Mental Health, Addictions recommends numerous strategies for self-care during pandemic

Oak Bay deputy police chief and family cut Guatemala vacation short to return home

Belize border, punctured gas tank part of the adventure

‘Better days will return’: Queen Elizabeth delivers message amid COVID-19 pandemic

The Queen said crisis reminds her of her first address during World War II in 1940

Emergency aid portal opens Monday, cash could be in bank accounts by end of week: Trudeau

Emergency benefit will provide $2,000 a month for those who have lost their income due to COVID-19

Education, not enforcement: B.C. bylaw officers keeping a watch on physical distancing

A kind word, it turns out, has usually been all people need to hear

COVID-19: Hospitals remain safe for childbirth, say Vancouver Island care providers

North Island Hospital has been asked to share its perinatal COVID-19 response plan

Canadian cadets to mark 103rd anniversary of Vimy Ridge April 9 virtually

Idea of Captain Billie Sheridan in Williams Lake, B.C. who wondered what to do in times of COVID-19

B.C. VIEWS: Pandemic shows need for adequate care home staffing

Seniors in B.C. care homes face challenging times

QUIZ: How much do you know about hockey?

Take this test and find out how well you know Canada’s most popular winter sport

Researchers look at humidity as a weapon in the fight against airborne viruses

Regular hand washing, physical distancing and PPE for health care workers remains best line of defense

Most Read