This Tim Horton’s location in Saanich had to cut back on hours earlier this year because it lacked staff. A new survey released this week finds high housing costs hurts recruitment of workers in the Greater Victoria area. Black Press file

Unaffordable housing blamed for Capital Region job shortages

Greater Victoria survey identifies transit as a recruitment barrier

A new report identifies unaffordable housing but also transit as obstacles to the recruitment of staff.

These findings emerge from a survey into factors affecting employee recruitment in Greater Victoria that Chemistry Consulting Group conducted between July 15 and Aug. 10. They match earlier reporting in the Saanich News, which found local companies are struggling to fill jobs, with unemployment in July around 3.7 per cent, according to Statistics Canada.

The survey, mixing quantitative and qualitative questions, garnered 250 responses from businesses across 10 different sectors with the highest number of responses coming from businesses in the accommodation, recreation and tourism services, professional services, retail, and food & beverage sectors.

But if respondents ranged across small, medium and large companies across sectors, almost 60 per cent “believe the current shortage of housing is making it difficult for them to attract employees from outside of Victoria.” Of the remaining respondents, 19.2 per cent are unsure if the shortage of housing is having an impact. Just over 24 per cent – 23.6 per cent – said it is not having an impact on their ability to attract employees.

The identified relationship between housing and recruitment appears especially strong in the lower wage segment. A total of 78.1 per cent of respondents who said housing makes it difficult for them to recruit potential workers said they have difficulty finding employees to fill entry-level roles. “However, respondents also indicated that the housing shortage is making it difficult to attract employees at all other levels,” it read.

This said, not all respondents accepted the theory that the lack of affordable housing is hurting recruitment. Several respondents instead pointed towards lacking work ethics, inadequate training and a hostile business environment as culprits. “Housing is not the issue a lack of opportunity, real or perceived, and the fact that this is an island are the issues,” read one response.

Respondents also identified as a transit as detriment in the qualitative section of the survey.

“Many of our candidates for entry level positions reside in Langford,” read one of the responses. “Public transportation is not very practical. Efficient transportation from Langford/Victoria up to the Saanich peninsula is simply not available in the early mornings.”

Release of the survey coincided with plans announced by the provincial government to increase the minimum wage to $15/hour in the next four years, a move small business owners have denounced.

While Chemistry Consulting conducted the survey before the announced increase, the subject appears throughout the survey.

One respondent said he would favour an increase to $15 per hour. “If I do this alone my expenses increase and my profits decrease,” it read. “If the minimum wage is increased to $15 per hour, then all minimum wage employees have more spending money. The minimum wage employees will most likely spend this money and it will generate more income for local business thus offsetting the cost of increasing the minimum wage.”

Several other respondents also favoured higher wages. “Lower wages prevent viable recruitment of well educated and experienced people,” said one respondent. “If the rent continues to increase, we will not be able to sustain entry level and hard labor positions. How are we going to operate?”

In fact, the survey suggests respondents have already been raising wages to attract staff. According to the survey, just over two-thirds of respondents said they have had to raise salaries to attract staff and management because of the region’s low unemployment rate and the higher cost of housing.

However the survey also found apprehension about higher wages. “Some of the respondents…indicated that they cannot afford to raise salaries, so are doing without staff,” it read. And even if they have raised salaries, the increases themselves might not be sufficiently alluring.

“(I raised salaries) 35 per cent and offer exceptional tip pool options, and I still cannot find and retain staff,” read one response.

Other comments suggest local governments have not done enough to ease regulations around affordable housing and business. “Raising the minimum wage is like putting a band aid on a severed appendage,” read one response. “The local government here in the CRD is probably the most corrupt and useless I’ve ever ever seen in my 43 years on this planet.”

Overall, the survey see business owners conscious of the relationship between wages, recruitment and housing, but also hesitant about raising the minimum wage, as the provincial government has recently done.

“Increasing wage rates make it difficult for me to compete (as I’m a small family owned and operated business),” read one response. “However increasing costs of living in Victoria make it difficult for young people to stay here and work.”

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A study by SlotsOnlineCanada notes there is at least 88 hours of top-rated horror movies for Canadians to consume this Halloween. (Unsplash)
Spooks and Chill study reveals Canada’s favourite horror flicks

88 hours of top-rated horror movies can fill COVID-19 Halloween

Coun. Tara Ney rakes leaves behind Oak Bay municipal hall. Ney’s motion asking staff to do a report on alternative options to the ongoing use of gas-powered leaf blowers in Oak Bay. (Travis Paterson/News Staff)
Oak Bay a step closer to banning gas leaf blowers

Council leans toward a study on alternatives

Maureen Cue models maybe the most obvious pandemic Halloween costume this year. (Kendra Crighton/News Staff)
Pandemic impacts trends in Halloween looks, says costume shop owner

Maureen Cue sees shift in costume rentals due to the pandemic

Alyssa Gerwing, executive director of the Sidney Museum and Archives, gets into the Halloween spirit with a lit-up jack-o-lantern. With Treat Street cancelled, the Sidney Business Improvement Area Society has organized a series of other events and activities under the heading of Halloween Spooktacular. (Wolfgang Depner/News Staff)
Sidney serves up ghoulish spills and thrills during Halloween

A virtual Halloween treasure hunt and scary drive-in movies among tricks and treats

Vancouver Island-based Wilson’s Transportation has expanded to fill some of the routes left unserviced by Greyhound as of Nov. 1, 2018. (Black Press files)
B.C. bus companies say they need help to survive COVID-19

Like airlines, motor coaches have lost most of their revenue

A woman wears a face mask and plastic gloves while browsing books as a sticker on the floor indicates a one-way direction of travel between shelves of books at the Vancouver Public Library’s central branch, after it and four other branches reopened with limited services, in Vancouver, on Tuesday, July 14, 2020. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)
B.C. reports 234 new COVID cases, 1 death of senior who had attended small birthday party

Roughly 5,700 people are isolating due to being exposed to a confirmed case

MNP senior economist Susan Mowbray presents the State of the Island Economic Report on Thursday night to conclude the Vancouver Island Economic Alliance’s virtual summit. (VIEA image)
Not-so-rosy State of the Island report caps off virtual summit

Vancouver Island Economic Alliance’s summit took place online Oct. 27-29

President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally in Allentown, Pa. on Oct. 26. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
POLL: How closely are you following the U.S. presidential election?

It may feel like it’s been going on forever but the U.S.… Continue reading

Burnaby RCMP responded to a dine-and-dash suspect who fell through a ceiling in March 2020. (RCMP handout)
VIDEO: Suspected dine-and-dasher falls through ceiling of Burnaby restaurant

A woman believed to be dashing on her restaurant bill fell through the kitchen ceiling

A can of Canada Dry Ginger Ale is shown in Toronto on Thursday Oct. 29, 2020. The maker of Canada Dry Ginger Ale has agreed to pay over $200,000 to settle a class-action lawsuit launched by a B.C. man who alleged he was misled by marketing suggesting the soda had medicinal benefits. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Joseph O’Connal
B.C. man’s lawsuit over marketing of Canada Dry ginger ale settled for $200K

Soda’s maker, Canada Dry Mott’s Inc., denied the allegations and any liability

A deer was spotted in October 2020 in Prince Rupert, B.C., with a bright pink yoga ball stuck in its antlers. (Kayla Vickers/Chronicles Of Hammy The Deer Official Page)
Hammy 2.0? Prince Rupert deer spotted with bright pink yoga ball stuck in antlers

The BC Conservation Officer Service is aware of the deer roaming around the city

RCMP. (Phil McLachlan - Black Press Media)
Kelowna Mountie hit with 2nd lawsuit in 2 months for alleged assault

Const. Julius Prommer is accused of breaking a woman’s knee during while responding to a noise complaint

Hirdeypal Batth, 24, has been charged with sexual assault and forcible confinement in relation to an incident in August 2020. (VPD handout)
Man, 24, charged with sex assault after allegedly posing as Uber driver in Vancouver

Investigators believe there could be more victims outside of the Vancouver area

Pilot Kevin Maher participated in a flyover of a ceremony at the Cobble Hill cenotaph on Oct. 22 in a 1940 North American (Noorduyn) Harvard aircraft. (Robert Barron/Citizen)
Cobble Hill remembers lost military members with ceremony, flyover

Annual event commemorates those who died in non-combat roles

Most Read