B.C. Hydro responds to attack on its smart meter technology

Explanations given about levels of radio frequency emissions

Re: Questions remain on wireless effects, but evidence growing (Letters, Feb. 8)

Smart meters are safe and communicate using radio frequency signals that are similar to what has been used for decades in televisions, radios and other common household devices. B.C.’s Provincial Health Officer, Health Canada and the World Health Organization all confirm the wireless meters pose no known health risks.

To put it in perspective, we asked a certified professional engineering firm located in North Vancouver to measure the power and duration of our new meter. The results confirm a B.C. Hydro smart meter communicates for 1.4 seconds per day. In other words, you would have to stand next to your meter for 20 years to get the equivalent amount of radio frequency as a 30 minute cellphone call.

As the project nears completion, customers are beginning to see the benefits of a more modern electrical system. For example, many customers now have access to new conservation tools through their secure online B.C. Hydro account, helping them save energy and money.

Later this year, customers will benefit from automatic outage detection that will help crews restore power faster and safer.

Smart meters are now standard equipment just like utility poles and power lines and are required to modernize the system and ensure the safe, efficient delivery of electricity to British Columbians.

We thank customers for their support and patience as we work to modernize our electricity system so we can continue to safely provide the electricity needed to power homes and businesses around the province every day.

Gary Murphy

Chief Project Officer, Smart metering and Infrastructure

B.C. Hydro

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