More awareness of domestic violence is a start for reducing such cases, but taking direct action when witnessing or suspecting such behaviours is needed to help stem the tide of incidents. FanPop photo

EDITORIAL: More direct action needed to reduce domestic violence

Commitment of resources by Victoria police a good start, but more can be done

Last week several hundred people marched to the steps of the legislature as part of the MooseHide campaign, the aim of which is to draw attention to a plague of violence against women and children.

Earlier in the week a two-day training seminar was held for law enforcement officers, psychologists, social workers and others to educate them on the trauma caused by this type of violence and the long-lasting effects of domestic abuse.

VicPD has set the bar for dedicating resources to the problem of domestic abuse. Two officers serve on the Regional Domestic Violence unit and six others solely within the Victoria department. With the exception of Saanich, which has one dedicated officer dealing with domestic violence, none of the other Greater Victoria municipalities have any officers specializing in this area.

As much as the dedication of resources within Victoria is a start, far more need to be done.

The Ending Violence Association of B.C. reports that every year more than 60,000 B.C. women are physically or sexually assaulted. Only about 12 per cent of sexual assaults are ever reported to police and, according to the head of the Regional Domestic Violence Unit, the bulk of those cases are handled by line officers with limited training in the unique challenges faced by victims of these crimes.

That has to change. More resources are urgently needed. And it’s something that should be at the top of the agenda for municipalities and police departments around the region. Domestic abuse and violence against women and children in general has long-lasting impacts on the victims and those who witness it.

As a society we need to do more than wear pins and march in support of the victims, as much as those efforts help raise awareness. What is needed is a concerted effort to change our culture.

Reporting violence in one’s own home is extremely difficult and we applaud those with the courage it takes to do so. It’s also important that people who see or suspect that domestic violence is occurring speak out as a way to end the violence.

Just Posted

Saanich police are seeking suspect in sexual assault report

Incident happened early Saturday morning near Rudd Park

Saanich to hear update on regional sewage treatment plant

Likely subjects of presentation include fate of trees along Grange Road, costs

Canadian students are smart cookies

Canadian teachers also among highest paid in the developed world

Local fundraising initiative addresses tampon recall

Period Posse checking donations during 10-day campaign

Victoria Literacy Connection needs volunteers for new Reading Partner program

The program will be in five Greater Victoria elementary schools

Langford elementary school kids test their hand at entrepreneurship

Students sold their own products at a Young Entrepreneurs Fair Friday

POLL: Are you dreaming of a white Christmas?

The rain Vancouver Island is famous for is coming down in buckets,… Continue reading

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers wanted list for the week of Dec. 11, 2018

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

Microscopic parasite found in Prince Rupert water affecting thousands

More than 12,000 residents affected by the boil water advisory issued Dec. 14

Trudeau lashes out at Conservatives over migration “misinformation”

Warning against the “dangers of populism,” Trudeau says using immigration as a wedge political issue puts Canada’s future at risk.

B.C. hockey coach creates ‘gear library’ to remove cost barrier of sport

Todd Hickling gathered donations and used gear to remove the cost barrier for kids to play hockey.

Canada’s ambassador meets with second detainee in China

Global Affairs says John McCallum, Canada’s ambassador to China, met with Spavor Sunday

‘They’re coming:’ Flying cars may appear in urban skies by 2023

Air taxis will number 15,000 and become a global market worth $32 billion by 2035

B.C. VIEWS: Andrew Wilkinson on taxes, ICBC and union changes

Opposition leader sees unpredictable year ahead in 2019

Most Read