More parking would disturb Glendenning habitat

In the future we will celebrate our green spaces and our trees more than our parking lots and cars

Our unique, narrow, winding road is in danger. Glendenning Road is about a third of a mile long and runs off of Mt. Douglas Cross Road. There are 18 residences. The Blenkinsop Valley Golf Course borders properties at the northern end of the road. It is part of the Centennial Trail. Glendenning Road is a great place to get away from the rest of the traffic and congestion in the city.

Several large trees growing where nature planted them make it a narrow road and make passing another car only possible in a few areas. Courtesy is often shown; in fact it is quite common for large trucks to back from Mt. Doug X Road to their destination on Glendenning. With only two street lights, one at each end of the road, it is beautifully dark so it is easy to see the light of a commuter cyclist. We celebrate being rural.

The path on the west side, always known as a “Bridle Path”, was maintained as such by the municipality: side bushes were trimmed and hog fuel applied as needed. Whether being ridden or walked, horses have and still do use what part of the path they can, as they go into the park. Nowadays cyclists and walkers outnumber cars on any given day.

The fire road access into Mt. Douglas Park is at the north end of Glendenning, with a small five-car parking lot beside it. There is no argument that the fire department needs access to the park and to Glendenning. An unattended fire on the mountain would spread to several neighbourhoods immediately via the tree canopy. With five cars in the lot there is enough room for fire trucks to access the street and park.

This small parking lot is the centre of the conflict because after the first five cars have arrived, the rest of the cars have been parking where ever they could, gradually turning the “Bridle Path” into overflow parking. Like other invasive species the cars multiply.

Glendenning Road itself has changed little in the 47 years we have lived here, however, change is happening on our road.  This summer, “No parking” signs appeared. This caused inconvenience for park visitors and residents alike. With a full lot, visitors have to relocate. Residents have to canvas their neighbours for places for family cars.

There has been a proposal to make Glendenning Road like every other residential street, cut down trees, straighten the road, add curbing, etc. Another would have Saanich purchase two properties close to the small parking lot, which encompass over three acres and turn them into parking lots. While this would solve the parking situation and fire access it would destroy the rural beauty of this road. When you look at an overhead view of Mt. Doug Park you see that the park continues down our road, unlike the other areas that border the park. It is because of the trees beside the road and more on our properties that this ecological area hasn’t been destroyed by development: we are the transition between development and the ALR.

A tree inventory in 2005 reported 93 Garry oak, 77 Douglas fir, 17 grand fir and 16 others for a total of 203, only six of which may have been on private property.

I know change is hard, but if we think of Saanich in the next 50 years we will celebrate our green spaces and our trees more than our parking lots and cars. Like the song says, “Please don’t pave paradise to put up a parking lot.”

Ed Polinsky

Saanich

 

Just Posted

Four-sailing wait at BC Ferries Swartz Bay terminal

Full vessels create long waits on Friday afternoon

A year in tent city: Timeline of Camp Namegans

Since September 2017, Victoria’s homeless camp has set up in more than 20 locations

Tent city campers prepare to leave Uplands Park

Vehicle access remains restricted at Cattle Point

Tommy Chong says cannabis legalization makes him proud to be a Canadian

Legendary marijuana advocate and comedian celebrates cultural milestone at Kelowna event

‘Repeat test fails’ clogging up the system, says ICBC

Increased driver education key to shorter wait times, safer roads

WATCH: Twelve Angry Jurors puts a new spin on an old tale

Canadian College of Performing Arts opens season with reworked version of Reginald Rose teleplay

B.C. tickets win big in Lotto Max draw

Jackpot carried over; B.C. tickets share Max Millions prizes

Crime Stoppers most wanted for Greater Victoria for Oct. 19

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

POLL: Do you support amalgamation for communities in the Capital Region?

Residents in Victoria and Saanich will be voting on Oct. 20 on… Continue reading

‘Mom, I’m in trouble:’ Canadian faces 10 years for alleged graffiti

Brittney Schneider, another tourist caught spraying message on walls of Tha Pae Gate in Thailand

Feds consulting on national anti-racism strategy behind closed doors

Heritage Minister Pablo Rodriguez says people still face systemic racism in some communities

Enbridge aims for mid-November to finish B.C. pipeline repair after blast

A natural gas pipeline that ruptured and burned near Prince George caused an explosion and fireball

How to get government cheques if Canada Post staff go on strike

The Canadian Union of Postal Workers said members could go on rotating strikes as early as Monday

Most Read